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MAY you treasure this as a dear 
memory book of the days 
spent within the walls of our Alma 
Mater, for that is what we have 
tried to make it. One great favor 
we ask and that is, judge us not too 
harshly for our mistakes, but try to 
appreciate the labor of the hours 
we have spent. 










THE-PINE-KNOT 




' I ^ E. C. Hillyer, who is not only an engineer 
in the industrial and commercial world, but 
also is an architect of character by his interest and 
efforts in behalf of Christian Education, we dedi- 
cate this volume of the Pine Knot. 





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Book I 




THE COLLEGE 




Book II 




THE CLASSES 




Book III 




SPECIALS 




Book IV 




ACTIVITIES 




Book V 




HUMOR AND ADVERTISEMENTS 


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THE-PINEKNOT 



President Howard Stevens Hilley 

T70R the past five years the name of Howard S. Hilley has heen 
-*- inseperably linked with the rapid growth of Atlantic Christian 
College. While he was Dean of the College he had a vision for its 
future which might be evidenced from his words, "Progress must 
continue or a slump will be inevitable." President Hilley wrote 
these words in 1921; and, since that time, progress for Atlantic 
Christian College has been the dominating passion of his life. 
The very thought of a "slump" would be revolting to him ; the im- 
possibility of standing still is well known to him, and intelligent 
ambition forces him toward the door of progress. Under his leader- 
ship the college has made the greatest advancement in its history. 
The student body has been doubled; the endowment fund has been 
materially increased; and an "A" rating has been secured for the 
college. These are concrete evidences of his executive ability and 
boundless energy. His calm earnestness in face of stern difficulties 
has given the disciples of his constituency a sure sense of walking 
in the right path in furthering the advancement of Christianity. 




•fe^u>* 






THE-PINEKNOT 



Board of Trustees 



TERMS EXPIRING 1926 

W. E. Peoctob Grimesland, X. C. 

J. W. Hikes Rocky Mount, N. C. 

C. W. Howard Kinston, N. C. 

A. J. Move Farmville, X. C. 

0. V. Cannon .Ayden, X. C. 

E. C. Hillyer Raleigh, X. C. 

C. L. Hardy : Maury, X. C. 

J. C. Richardson... ...Garnett 3 S. G. 

TERMS EXPIRING 1027 

George Hackney. Chairman Wilson, X. ( '. 

Claude Kiser Greensboro, X. C. 

,T. Fred Taylor Kinston, X. ( '. 

W. C. Manning ._ Williaraston, X. ( !. 

L. J\ Chapman Grifton, X. ( '. 

C. H. Rawls Raleigh, X. C. 

Dr. C. S. Eagles Wilson, X. C. 

W. B. Turner Aiken, S. C. 

TERMS EXPIRING 1928 

X. J. Rouse Kinston, N. ( '. 

E. H. Messick Winston-Salem, N. C. 

G T. Gardner Grifton, N. C. 

W. E. Hooker Greenville, X. C. 

W. H. Brunson Ayden, X. C. 

C. B. Mashburn Charlotte, N. C. 

1 1 . Galt Braxton..... Kinston, X. C. 

B. B. Kirkland Columbia, S. C. 

HOXORARY TRUSTEE FOR LIFE 
Col. S. B. Taylor Catherine Lake, X. C. 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 
II. S. 1 1 ili.ky President 

F. F. Grim Dean 

Charles C. Ware General Secretary and Field Worker 

Perry Case , Registrar 

Mrs. A. R. Moore Dean of Women 

Frances F. Harper Secretary of Faculty 

Myrtie L. Harper Librarian 

Mrs. Julia Ross Matron, Women's Dormitory 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Faculty 




Henrietta M. Ruhsenbergek, A.B., M.A. 
Professor of Modern Languages 



Annette Steele, A.B., MA. 
Professor of English 




C. H. Hamlin, A.B., M.A. 

Social Science 





E. L. Pox, A.B., M.A. 
Chemistry and Biology 





THE-PINE-KNOT 




Miss Atlantic Christian 

\/l ISS Atlantic Christian is graduating this year. She lias had a hard time these twenty-three years, but 
■^ -*■ she is going to graduate about as young as the average girl. One couldn't say she is a" beautiful 
girl because she does not dress quite as expensively as some of her friends, but she is one that is not easily 
forgotten. Her parents are not by any means wealthy, in fact, some folk say they don't see how they 
live under such financial adversity, and they couldn't, had it not been for Atlantic Christian. Sometimes it 
seemed that she would not exist another year but she knew the progress of her parents, the Disciple 
Christians — rested upon her shoulders. If she failed, they would fail. 

Lo, these many years she lias hoped that some rich friend would help her or that she would be re- 
membered in somebody's will. Several of her friends have been favored in this way and she, herself, 
has been "donated to" but by no big amount. No one has thought enough of her to buy her pretty clothes 
and luxuries that a girl of her A grade standing needs. Her heart has been broken these many times 
she has been slighted because she couldn't look like other people of her class, but she has apparently kept 
her same friendly attitude toward every one. 

Nor has she been free from melancholy spells, resulting from criticism of her own self. Some of the 
members of her body have told her that she is ugly and hateful ami that they hated themselves because 
they were connected with her in any way. They lament the fact they were dtetined for such as she. 
They say her hands are put tine: a brand on them that they will never outgrow. They are not willing 
to surrender their "superiority" to her sway. Sometimes these forces grow so strong that she defines 
her state as a "divided-self." One mind says do this and one mind says do that, but her prevailing spirit 
results in good judgment based on sound knowledge. These little boils that spring out on her face 
occass ion ally are only one of the trials of life. They are soon cured and she goes about her work 
joyfully again. 

There is one thing that people cannot justly accuse Atlantic Christian of doing. You have never 
seen her with any paint on her face. The red you see as you look at her from the street is perfectly 
natural. She tries to keep clean and attractive with the best she has, and to those who know her, shabby 
cloth.es are not noticed. A'"passer-by" would not be attracted by her, but it is those who feel the pull 
of her personality that love her. 

There is something that has been weighing on Atlantic Christian's mind for the last, several years, 
especially this year. Her one purpose is to teach, but she does not want to do it unless she can 
compare favorably with her friends. The only thing that will prevent her doing it will be the lack of funds. 
She cannot hold her standing unless she has more to offer her students in a material way. She is 
already an excellent teacher, but with the means she would be a superior one. 

Atlantic Christian must decide what she is going to do next year. The question is a very vital one 
and must soon be decided so she has begun to make preparations. Brother Lynchburg has told her 
that he will help her out and that the two of them can work together, but somehow that doesn't sound 
"so good." She is afraid he will not consider her his equal. There is Sister Elon. She has given her 
an invitation to go and live with her so that both may share what they have in common. Atlantic 
Christian thought that would be the solution at first, but after further consideration she is afraid it will 
not work well, since they have been separated so long. They may have ideas and ideals that can never 
be reconciled. 

Not very long ago Atlantic. Christian was excited by a letter she received. It was some of her 
correspondance with the rich Mr, Duke, and if she marries him she can teach in his big university and 
come in contact with some of the "high brows" of the land. Her association would doubtless be a very 
happy one if her husband would be conscious of her existence. If she does marry Mr. Duke, people 
could not say that it was her first chance because there is another old friend who would like to havfe 
her influence on his life. This is Mr. N. C. University. His proposal came first and has not yet been 
answered. He is one that is loved by us all and he has quite a favorable reputation. It seems this is 
the decision so many grils have to make. Shall I marry for love or money or be an old maid? 

Several positions have opened up for her if she remains unmarried. She can go to Raleigh, or Winston- 
Salem, or Rocky Mount. All these places offer splendid opportunities if she can get enough money to give 
her a foothold. 

For sentiment's sake she had rather stay in her old home, Wilson, but "a prophet is never known in 
his own land," so she "sorter" feels as though she could do better elsewhere, unless her Wilson friends 
show a little affection for her. 

All these opportunities are, before her, and yet* there is an objection to every one of them. The idea 
that, like so many graduates, she may accomplish nothing, haunts her constantly. The doors of 
opportunity are open, but it will be easier to stand back and not enter. 

Atlantic Christian's recent victories in football have put new life into her. They have won more 
friends for her than any amount of silent studying would have done. She is more anxious than ever 
to make for herself a career. This means she is inclined to be an old maid, and her own bo&s. Her plans 
are to own twenty-five or fifty acres among her friends — among those who seem to want her most. On this 
site she plans to build a beautiful home that will be convenient and adequate to accommodate her friends. 
She will have a beautiful yard with plenty of room for athletics. She will be dressed like other people 
and not burdened with the uncertainty of another day's bread. She will be just the same Atlantic 
Christian that you and I know now; and we will lie welcome at her house. Her parents, the Disciple 
Christians, will have opened their hearts by that time, and they will be made strong through Atlantic 
Christian. She has not told me in what town she is going to locate, but I am sure she will go where she 
can serve best. 

Nannie Pearl Quinerly. 





JH 




CLASSES 



BOOK 
ii 






THE-PINEKNOT 




Anderson Bosweix 
Wilson, N. C. 

(3) Inter-societj Debate; Clieei' leader Hes- 
perian Society; President Wilson County Club; 
President Sopbomore Class. (4) Assistant 
Manager Pink Knot; President 'b K A; Treas- 
urer <b K A; Wrangler; Inter-collegiate Debater. 

Anderson, one of Wilson's own, is a 
Senior well beloved by all, and by one 
especially. He always has a cheerful word 
of greeting, and a personality that wins. 
With his ability as a speaker and debater, 
ho promises to become one of the leaders 
in his State; and, doubtless in the world 
at large, for his broad mind is one that 
can not be limited by any local bounda- 
ries. The same determination that wins 
his first degree will carry him to even 
greater success in years to come. 



Esther' Buyant 
Lucama, N. C. 

(4) Secretary Class; Dramatic Editor Pine 
Knot; Secretary Atbletic Association; Vice 
President Alethian Society; Treasurer V. W. C. A. 

During the four years Esther has been 
with us she has been willing to help any 
one over obstacles. Although her motto 
is "Do not let work interfere with pleas- 
ure." she has made good in her academic 
work as well as social activities. 

Esther is a real "honest to goodness" 
girl. She possesses sympathy, tact, and a 
loving personality. 






(3) Secretary Freshman Class; Secretary 
Sophomore Class;; Treasurer Y. \Y. ('. A.; Vice 
President A-l Club. (4) Secretary Hesperian 
Society; Y. W. C. A. f_';ibiin-t : Vice President 
E T X: President .11 Club; Vice President 
Athletic Association; Wit Editor Pink Knot. 

Since Mae has been at A. C. C. she has 
gladdened our hearts with her merry 
smiles and courageous enthusiasm. 
Although she will admit that there are 
many things she would rather do than 
study, you could not discover this by her 
grades. She can laugh with the happy, 
and weep with the weary, and as a 
specialty she can love with the lovers. 
Her's is a life that will find happiness 
in everything and everywhere. 





Moses Mote 
Farmville, N. C. 

CD Manager Football Team: President *En- 
semble Club; Music Editor Pine Knot; Chaplain 
Alethian Society. (4) Manager Baseball Team; 
Treasurer Athletic Association; Treasurer Senior 
Class; Athletic Editor Pine Knot; Secretary 
<P K A; Critic Alethian Society; President 
Alethian Society; Religious Education Committee; 
Intercollegiate Debater; President Education 
Club. 

It's hard to say what we would do with- 
out Moses's "Caruso" voice and genial 
good nature. We envy him his ability to 
carry on an animated conversation. When 
he tries he can "wax brilliant" in class 
too. When responsibility comes his way 
he always assumes it and does his duty 
earnestly and well. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



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John Ross 
Wilson, N. C. 

(3) Chaplain Alrthian Society; Assistant Wit 
Editor Pine Knot. (4) Wrangler. 

Betsy, or Mama's baby, as he has always 
been known, is a man of sterling charac- 
ter. He is the source of much pleasure; 
a cheerful giver and taker of the daily 
jokes that come up in student life. An 
aspirant to journalistic fame; the sport- 
ing editor of some great paper is the 
hope be looks forward to after leaving 
our halls. Ability, Art, and Agnes are 
the three outstanding affections of his 
life. 



Mittib Wiggins 

Elm City, N. C. 

(3) Class Historian. (4) Vice President Hes- 
perian Society; Chaplain Hesperian Society; Vice 
President Education Club; Secretary Y. W. C. A.; 
Secretary Scribbler's Club; Chairman Red Cross 
Work; Relisious Editor Pine Knot. 

Mittie, the baby member of our class, 
has all the good qualities of a baby and 
none of the bad ones. She seems to 
have- grown up in some ways though, for 
she takes great interest in social affairs 
this year. 

She is very teachable, loyal, and always 
willing to do her part in anything that 
is undertaken. 




THE-PlNE-KNQr 



Annie Harper 

Wilson, N. C. 

(4) Assistant Literary Editor Pink Knot; 
Vice President Alethian Society; Vice President 
Class; Business Manager Dramatic Club; Secre- 
tary Education Club. 

Annie has a welcome smile and a cheer- 
ful, lovable disposition that makes us 
feel that the world is breaking fourth 
with kindness, peace and happiness. We 
made our first acquaintance with her 
four years ago, when she made us feel 
welcome at A. C. C, and especially at 
the First Christian Church, where she is 
an efficient and dependable worker. 



L. J. Bickers 

Auburn, Ga. 

"All work and no play" seems to be 
the motto of Bickers. Coming from 
Georgia in the fall of 1924, Mr. Bickers — 
better known as "Bishop" — 'joined the 
Class of '26. Although married and an 
active minister, he has not isolated him- 
self from the "happy circle." His two 
years at A. C. C. have shown him to be 
worthy of recognition. The cheerfulness 
and persistence of his disposition have 
won the respect and confidence of his 
companions. Records bear testimony to 
his ability. His greatest ambition is to 
serve. In whatever profession he may 
cast his lot, he is sure to be found essay- 
ing with fearlessness of truth and right. 
And since strength of will power is as- 
surance of success, the greater A. C. C. 
will know John. 



Twenty-five 




THE-PINE-KNOT 





,\ 



1926 




Ciiaht.es James 
Rural Hall, N. C. 

(3) Chaplaifi Hesperian Society; Secretary 
Fellowship Club. (4) Chairman of Program 
Committee Education Chili. 

Four eventful years ago "Charles" fame 
to our institution to begin the eternal 
quest for higher education. During this 
time he has distinguished himself as 
being a student of extraordinary ability. 
His is a calm and unassuming type of 
mind. He is a great believer in democ- 
racy and is quick to uphold his cause 
when necessary. Truly, it may be said 
of him that he has lived nobly and sought 
honestly and justly the best for others 
and himself, now that he goes forth to 
make a vital contribution to the welfare 
of society. 



Nannie Pearl Qtinkkly 
Grifton, N. C. 

(1-2) Vice President Olnss. (-J) Inter-soriety 
Debate; Secretary Hesperian Society; Secre- 
tary Science Club. (2-3) Y. W. Cabinet; 
[teligious Education Committee. CD Critic Hes- 
perian Society; Vice President Hesperian Society; 
Literary Editor Pink Knot. i4) President 
Hesperian Society; President Y. VV. C. A.: Chair- 
man Program Commitee Education Club; Wrang- 
ler; Class Poet; Editor Pink Knot, 

"Nannie Pearl will do it." and sure 
enough she does. Just what we would do 
without her ever-present help is a ques- 
tion too difficult for the class of '26. 
Any one who possesses her friendship 
may be called lucky, for Nannie Pearl 
is, "true blue." We know success will 
crown whatever she may undertake, 
whether it be instructing the young in 
English Composition or "good house- 
keeping." 





THE-PINE-KNOT 




1926 



Macon Mooke 
Wilson, N. C. 

(3) Vice President Science Club; Vice President 
Education Club. 1 4 ) Treasurer Education Club; 
Wrangler; Literary Editor Pink Knot: Vice 
President Education Club; President Wilson 
County Club; President Senior Class. 

For four years Macon has brought her 
sunny smile to us, and when she is pres- 
ent all pessimism fades into the back- 
ground. When responsibility comes her 
way she assumes it and does her duty 
earnestly and well. As President of our 
Class she has been responsible for an in- 
fluence that will be felt long after she 
has gone. 



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(2) President Freshman Class; Chaplain 
Alethian Society. (3) President Education Club; 
Chairman Program Committee Education Club. 
i4) Religious Education Committee; Program 
Committee, Education Club. 

LeRoy presented himself to us three 
years ago with all the potentialities 
needed for a successful student career. 
Having been previously orientated, he 
came to us a versatile, energetic, conscien- 
tious, and persistent worker, both in class 
and in the field of religious endeavor. The 
educational and social ideals which ani- 
mate him, while resonable enough for 
him to realize, are sufficiently high to 
motivate his life to worthy accomplish- 
ments. 




Edgar Norwood Grady 

Seven Springs, N. C. 



Club. (4) Wrang- 

;m Society; Manager 

Debater; Business 



(3) President Educatin 
ler ; Vice President Hespe 
Basketball; Inter-society 
Manager Pine Knot. 



Norwood, better known as "Kink." 
came to us from Annapolis where he tirst 
began his college career. During his 
two years at A. C. C. he has been one of 
the best students in the college. He was 
not satisfied to do only his class work, 
but took a great interest in all the activ- 
ities of the college. He was an active 
member in various literary clubs and did 
a great deal toward promoting athletics. 



J ami-: Man mm; 
Middlesex, N. C. 

(1-2-3) Secretarj Class. (Hi Treasurer Aleth- 
ian Society; Chairman Program Committee 
Alethian Society; Music' Editor Pink Knot. (3-4) 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 14) Wrangler; President 
Education Club; President Alethian Society; As- 
sistiint Kilit or PINK Knot; CIiiss Prophet. 

Not slim, not tall, but the best of all — 
That's Janie. She is not only capable, 
but willing to assume the responsibilities 
which her friends cast upon her. Her 
many honors are a sure proof of her 
popularity both among students and fac- 
ulty. The Class of '26 is proud of her; 
we know she will prove herself a leader in 
the teaching profession as she has done 
in- college life. 



1 

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1 










THE-PINE-KNOT 



:W. 




1926 



Walter Randolph 

Washington, N. C. 

(3) Assistant Art Editor of Pink Knot; Class 
Poet. (4) Wrangler. 

"W. B. F." Randolph came to us three 
years ago from Washington. N. C. Since 
then he has grown in stature and favor 
with faculty and student body. He as- 
sumes his duties with genuine interest. 
He is modest, quiet and unassuming in 
his bearing; yet he impresses those who 
really know him as sincere, earnest and 
truthful. The class of '26 is sure of 
Walter's worth. We wish him real 
success. 





(2) Vice President Fellowship Club; Religious 
Education Committee; Chaplain Alethian Society; 
Treasurer Alethian Society. ( :i ) Religious Editor 
PlNB Knot. (4) Secretary Fellowship Chit); 
Inter-society Debate; Wrangler; Assistant Re- 
ligious Editor Pine Knot; Treasurer Alethian 
Society. 

Diligent and studious is he, and no 
task is too hard for a trial. He has 
chosen the ministry as his profession, 
and we know success awaits one so earn- 
est in his work as he. 




THE-PINEKNOT 



M 



1 




Senior Class Poem 



o 



YEARS that came and went so fast 
To bring us May again ! 



Our graduation friends attend 
For we have reached the end. 

Remember us when we are gone 
To fields we know not where. 

When we can be thy child no more 
Nor guided by thy loving care. 

The end to which our lives do lend 
Has been thy thought of us, 

And we, in turn, love thee most 
In whom we put our trust. 

Strong purposes our lives possess, 

Our hearts affections fill. 
We toil and earn, we seek and learn 

As we climb up the hill. 

With sword of faith and trusty hands 
With merry hearts and true 

The class of twenty-six will show 
The world what it can do. 



Nannie Pearl Qitinerxy. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Senior Impressions 



TT^IRST impressions are often not lasting impressions. This is true with the 
■*■ Seniors of '26. The usual feeling of strangeness vanishes when an unusually 
kind smile greets us. A hearty handshake and a kind word, which our president 
always extends to the students, go a long way in forming lasting impressions. 

After having stayed at Atlantic Christian College a while, we, the Seniors took 
particular notice of two main objectives which we firmly believe the institution 
stands for above all others. The first one has to do with religious education. 
The aim of the College is to lead its students in a religious way to meet life's 
demands fairly and squarely and to influence those with whom they come in con- 
tact. Many students come here veiled, so to speak. They do not know what they 
want to do, or in what direction they are going. The College purposes to lead 
and direct them 1 into the light and proper way of living. The motto: ."Habebunt 
Lumen Vitae," which means "They shall have the light of life," is proof enough 
for this statement. 

The other outstanding objective which has been stamped upon our memories 
during the last four years is that of a scholarly attitude toward work. We do 
not mind work, we think of it more as a privilege than as a burden. The college 
is a place of creative thought. In developing this atmosphere of work, it has 
become more or less a secluded institution. As we walk about the campus it 
seems to us that Atlantic Christian College is one of the many institutions work- 
ing quietly and with no ostentation to cultivate aspirations and ambitions in 
men and women to lead others out of the dark, and to prepare them to shoulder 
the burdens of our land on every occasion, in a truthful, religious way. 

We have worked together, here for this common purpose with that well-known 
Latin phrase, "Habebunt Lumen Vitae," always before us, inspiring us to work 
harder, and to go further for the good of humanity. 

Mittie Wiggins. 




Thirty-three 



f. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



m\ 



Class History 




TT is with pride that we recall the day, nearly four years ago, when we, the 
members of the Senior Class, entered upon our career. This day saw us, an 
aggregation of green, awkward girls and boys, file into the building to enter 
our names upon the College roll-book of Atlantic Christian College; there, day 
after day for four long weary years, to undergo discipline that we might gain 
"Wisdom and Understanding." Such perfect years of joy and happiness, inter- 
mingled with hard work and misfortunes seem months to us rather than years. 
Never were four years put more profitably, nor more pleasantly than these that 
have just passed ; and, if each of us live the life of Methuselah, the years which 
stand out most distinctly to us will be those spent at A. C. C. During these year? 
we have been in training for a worthy purpose, which is either to teach, to preach, 
or to be in other ways servants to our God in the upbuilding of humanity. 

Our Freshman year seemed almost like a dream to us; yet some parts of it 
seemed like a nightmare — and a horrible one at that. How green we were! And 
what fun the old students had ! However, by the end of the term our "color" had 
entirely worn out, and we left in May realizing fully that our task was not 
complete. 

We regarded it a pleasure to surrender our places as Freshmen to those who 
were following us, and wished them a good and glorious victory. At least we 
were classified as Sophomores, so we turned our faces once more towards the goal 
with stronger hearts and confronted the new problems of our second year's work. 

September of the third year arrived and some of us found ourselves back on 
the campus again. We looked around and found that there were only twelve 
of the forty-six Sophomores to begin the Junior work. Yet this did not cause us 
to lose courage, nor to lose sight of the goal; for we realized that these twelve 
could win anything. Our Junior year began ; we were full of determination and 
much real work was accomplished, and the time was so fully taken up with 
school problems and social affairs that we could hardly believe that it was time 
for final exams, when we saw the schedule posted. 

As the time rolled on we found ourselves Seniors, ready to take up the heavier 
burdens and bear them on to heights vet unsealed. At our first Senior Class 
Meeting we found that we had increased in number; for there were eighteen in 
this year. At this meeting Macon Moore was elected President of the class ; 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Annie Harper Vice President; Esther Bryant, Secretary; and Moses Moye, 
Treasurer. This year we have a new duty to perform. This new duty, or mission, 
as we may call it, is not to further our own selfish interests, but to help mankind. 
Realizing as we do that neither wealth nor position can lift our country into 
greatness, there devolves upon us the grave responsibility of awakening the world's 
thoughts to the realization that the true hope of the world lies deep in Christian 
Education. 

Before us spread out in panoramic sweeps are fields untrodden, depths yet un- 
fathomed, heights yet unsealed. Gathering inspiration from the new fields of action 
still lying before us, we lift high our royal banner, and go forward from glory 
to glory. We have only a few more days; our hearts begin to ache, and we grow 
sad as the year draws near the end. 

We love you dear old A. C. C. and long, long years after we have gone the ties 

and friendships which we have made here will remain alive and vivid in our 

memory. There is a spot in our heart, and a large one at that, for you, our 

Alma Mater. 

Seniors, the task rests with you; 

Are you ready to strive, dare and do? 

Moses T. Move, Historian. 





Thirty-five 




THE-PINEKNOT 




Last Will and Testament 

TXTHEREAS, the Class of 1926, having reached that point in college life 
» * known as Advanced Seniority, is about to bid farewell to the classroom 
and dormitories and pass forth into the world — that broader and fuller life in 
comparison with which college days are but a preparation, and since there are, 
by virtue of heredity rights, not a few possessions of various kinds that must 
needs be disposed of in some manner, we, the Seniors of Atlantic Christian College, 
dc hereby take this method, in the publication of this our last will and testament, 
of passing on the lessons taught us by the best of all teachers, Experience, and 
do herein bequeath, give, donate, and in other ways let unto the persons and 
organizations hereinafter mentioned, the following property and right of the 
said class, to be used by the hereinafter mentioned persons and organizations as 
they may in their judgment see fit to use and exercise. 

SECTION T 

Article 1. To the Faculty we give forever our love and esteem and our deep- 
est. respect for the patience, kindliness and sympathy with which they have helped 
us to attain our final goal. 

Article 2. To our college President, we lovingly and sincerely tend our many 
absences from chapel and all those old musty reports not hereinafter bequeathed 
to others. May these ever keep the remembrance of the class clear in his mind. 

Article 3. To our beloved and respected Dean, our faithful guide through the 
theories of Education, we do bequeath and make him sole heir to all books, term 
papers, pertaining to this course, and with these, by these and through these, may 
he be encouraged to much "parallel reading." 

Article 4. To our Registrar, we grant the supreme pleasure of adding to his 
book the names of the incoming class of 10 — and lovingly and tenderly give to 
be kept forever in kind and lasting remembrance of all those reports that have 
been heaped on the class concerning conduct and class absences. 

Article 5. To our Dean of Women, Mrs. Moore, we give our most sincere 
and heartfelt thanks for the tender care she has given this class during its four 
years in college. May all entrants to this institution lie as appreciative of her 
masterly care as we are. 

Article 6. To our Alma Mater we give loyalty, pledging ourselves to make it 
a better and more glorious institution. 

SECTION II 

Article 1. To the Class of nineteen twenty-seven we will and bequeath all the 
joys of Seniorhood, the privilege and dignity along with the responsibility. May 
your Senior year be filled with happiness and success and your commencement day 
find you filled with the consciousness of a well-fought fight. 

Article 2. We bequeath to the Sophomore Class the sobriety and dignity that 
becomes a Junior, and require a promise that they will duly conform with said 
restrictions if they expect to become great Seniors, even as we have been. 

Thirty-six 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Article 3. "We bequeath to the Freshman Class all the good counsel and advice 
we have been able to gather from various- sources during the past four years, and 
refer them in our absence, for future advice on all subjects, to Mr. John Barclay. 

Article 4. To the Class of 1930 we bequeath four years of college life, with all 
its trials and pleasures, all the first-hand experiences with both teacher and student, 
city, and campus — the unbounded delight of every other Saturday night dates, the 
afternoons at the World, and all that time may bring to a college student. 

SECTION III 

Article 1. I, Esther Bryant, will my Senior dignity to Mary Harper. 

Article 2. I, Janie Manning, leave a generous supply of my avoirdupois to 
Evelyn Huggins. 

Article 3. I, Mae Reel, leave my "argumentativeness" to Eloise Bowers. 

Article 4. I, Nannie P. Quinerly, leave my executive ability to Mary Jones. 

Article 5. I, Annie Harper, bequeath my dramatic power to Esther Cobb. 

Article 6. I, Linda Clanton, will my musical talent to Violet Goodwin. 

Article 7. I, Mittie Wiggins, leave my frank and unaffected nature to Helen 
King. 

Article 8. I, Macon Moore, leave my ready smile and coveted dimples to Edna 
Wood. 

Article 9. I, Norwood Grady, leave my ability to get out of work to John 
Winfield. 

Article 10. I, Walter Randolph, leave my devotion to chemistry to Cecil Reel. 

Article 11. I, John Ross, leave my "originality" and wit to James Lawson. 

Article 12. I, Moses Moye, bequeath my ability to entertain in both a con- 
versational and musical way to Hilton Windley. 

Article 13. I, Anderson Boswell, bequeath my Senior dignity to two boys of 
the Junior Class to whom it is most appropriate — Hugh Ross and Reuben Banks. 

Article 14. I, John Bickers, will part of my intelligence and dogmatism to 
Leman Barnhill. 

Article 15. 1, LeRoy Harriss, bequeath my regular church attendance and re- 
ligious attitudes to Alton Belangia. 

Article 16. I, Charles James, give all my loving disposition to Marshall 
Brinkley. 

Article 17. I, Paul Southard, bequeath all my week-end visits to Greensboro 
to Sumter Bowen. 

Mae Reel. 




Thirty-seven 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Class Prophecy 




WELL, Nannie Pearl, this job is done at last — but you know it has been lots 
of fun. I had no idea that when I got Mr. llilley's letter asking me to 
do this research work for liini that it would be sucb a big job. Let me see if I 
have answered all his questions. 



H 



Wilson, N. C, June 18, 1936. 
Miss Janie Manning 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Dear Miss Manning: 

I am writing to ask you if you will help me get the tacts whidh I am seeking con- 
cerning the class of twenty-six of which you were a member. We are making a scientific 
survey of the students who have gone out from our college during the last ten years. 
This is being done in order that we may measure the success of our work. The informa- 
tion we would like to get is as follows: Where are they? What are they doing? How 
successful are they? 

I will thank you very much if you will answer these questions about the members of 
the class with whom you are familiar. 

Yours in the faith. 

H. S. Hii.ley. 



Now doesn't that sound like Professor Grim and Professor Case? I just know 
they put this idea into Mr. llilley's head, for they always were great on measuring 
results. You must be anxious to hear what I discovered, but first let me tell you 
what I said about you? 

"Nannie Pearl Quinerly is in Greensboro. So successful lias her work been as 
editor of the Greensboro Daily News that she is now drawing a salary of 
$15,000 a year. Her noted editorials have doubled and trebled the number of 
subscribers in the three years she has been there. She was honored last spring by 
being elected President of the North Carolina Newspaper Editors Association." 

On my trip to New York last summer I arrived on Broadway in time to attend 
church. I had not forgotten the habits formed while at college — who should 1 
see in the pulpit but LeEoy Harriss telling in very flourishing terms about the 
soul of the Filipino. He was a missionary to the islands and was sent out by 
the Southern Division of the Y. M. C. A., and was telling of the ways and 
bardships of the people. 

While on this same trip I went to the Metropolitan Opera House. Madame 
Linda Clanton Carr was seated at the piano pronouncing silvery tones which 
captivated the magnificent audience of celebrated musicians, whose deafening ap- 
plause welcomed her as one of their number. 

I found Annie Harper at the bead of a terrible school of the rising generation, 
drilling into the minds of those terrible girls the ravages of the rouge-pot and 
rolled hose. She told me that the practica teaching she did under the supervision 
of Mrs. Case had not proved to be practical in Higginsville. "Those methods 
simply will not harmonize with everything." 

Walter Randolph is now in Yellowstone Park doing some special work for 
the government. It seems that in this work he had some extra fine calculations 
which proved to be the result of the working out of the amount of water that 1 was 
flowing from the geysers, and as a reward for his untiring work along this line 
he was now getting together the necessary data to figure how long it would take the 




THE- PINE-KNOT 



water of the Pacific Ocean, flowing at the rate of the Great Geyser through a hole 
the same size, to empty into the Atlantic Ocean, and also how much oil would have 
to be used to oil the wheels of time. 

Moses Moye wrote that he roamed around for awhile after graduation as a 
singing evangelist. Thinking he could do better than this, he continued his good 
work at college and is now professor of Pure Mathematics at Duke University. 
This course has become one of the most popular on the campus. So eager are 
the students for a class under this professor that they are willing to stand during 
the whole hour. 

Charles James is in the service of the Pacific Wireless Company and is in 
charge of the main office in San Francisco. He followed the jeweler's trade for a 
time, but the love of the telegraph key called him and he responded, getting into 
the wireless side. He likes the game "fine," but says there is one call that worries 
him to death at night and it is generally followed by a walk, intermingled with 
yells. The call reads, "P-A-P-A." 

Imagine my surprise when I found Mae Keel the manager of a dancing school at 
Jarvisburg, North Carolina. Hundreds of girls pride themselves on being under 
the supervision of Miss Reel. The beauty of the steps that she has improvised 
is quite striking. Mae is still unmarried. Never being able to decide which man 
she loved best, she has never dared to make a matrimonial venture. 

John Ross came up to tell me about himself and what he was doing for the good 
of the world. He looked exceedingly prosperous and in answer to the question as 
to how he was living he went on to narrate : "Well it happened this way. After 
graduation I went on the road for Armour & Company, but I did not like it so 
I settled down at home, with the dearest little woman on earth, at Haw River, 
and there went into business. My experince I acquired while working at Young's 
has helped me a deal, and I'm here today buying goods. As a side line I am 
trainer and coach of the city track team, which is to compete with the other teams 
of the State." 

I had quite a bit of trouble finding the whereabouts of John Bickers. After 
preaching for five years be seemed to have faded from existence. We could not 
afford to lose sight of the "Solomon" of the class, so I continued my search. 
His son began giving*, him so much trouble he thought it best to move away from 
the vices of the "White Way." I located him down on a farm in Hyde County. 
John has discovered a new kind of corn, which if treated by a certain chemical 
know only to himself, precipitates into a fine brand of North Carolina Cornflakes. 

Mittie Wiggins succumbed to an attack of the heart soon after graduation — "I 
am married and as happy as can be. There is nothing like it," wrote Mittie. 
Besides being a successful home builder, and writing all the speeches her husband 
delivers, she takes an active part in the politics of Elm City. 

Norwood Grady opened up an insurance office at Hamlet two years after 
graduation. He is not as successful in keeping a wife as in selling insurance. 
"Kink" has been married four times and is single now. Since his business does 
not occupy all of his time he finds some time for writing. His latest publication 
is a book entitled, "Information of All Kinds on All Lines" — price ten cents. 

Esther Bryant says she found teaching attractive from the beginning, and after 
three years service at Sugar Loaf she spent two years studying at Harvard. She is 
now the Head of the Department of English at Elon College. Her husband is a 
professor in this same department. 

Anderson Boswell returned to the farm after graduation, but did not remain 
there long. One night there was a lecturer, at a town in which he happened to be, 



THE-PINE-KNOr 




discoursing the political situation of North Carolina. After the lecture was 
over, he invited questions. Anderson proceeded to question him and so confused 
him that he did not know what to do. Of course his fame locally was established 
and at the next election he was persuaded to run for the House of Representatives 
and defeated his opponent by a handsome majority. At the next election he went 
to the Senate, where he is now. It is said that when he runs for Governor in the 
next election he is expected to have the largest majority ever returned in North 
Carolina. 

Paul Southard has not yet "figured out" why water runs down a hill, but he will 
admit that it does. After five years of hard labor Paul discovered a method of 
teaching the feeble-minded. Immediately after this marvelous discovery he accepted 
a position in the Caswell Training School at Kinston, N. C. He writes that he is 
not satisfied since his wife refused to live there with him. 

Macon Moore, excellent in speech and skilled in much wisdom, completed a 
law course at, the University of Wisconsin, and soon became one of the law-makers 
of the land. She is now entering her "Seventh Heaven," for she is sitting for 
her first time on the Supreme Court bench. Macon listened to "His Story," how- 
ever, and has changed her name. 

Now what do you think of the "success" of the class of '26? I feel quite sure 
that no class will measure higher. Come, go with me to mail this to Mr. Hilley ? 
He must be getting impatient for the "important information." 

Janie Manning. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Class Song 

T^VSAR A. C. O, we'd give the world 
**** To live again the lovely past. 
Thy lofty aims and purpose high 
Within our hearts we'll cherish fast. 
You have a part in every dream ; 
Our happiest thoughts are full of thee. 
The years so short to us have seemed 
Here at our dear old A. C. C. 




Chorus 
O ! A. C. 0, dear A. C. C., 
The days may come, the days may go, 
But still our thoughts will turn to thee 
And praise of thee will ever flow. 

II 
Dear A. C. O, we hate to leave 
And part, from friends we love so true; 
Our hearts to thee will constant cleave, 
Dear Alma Mater, all life through. 
For us the past has no regret; 
Whate'er the years to us may bring, 
To thee we owe a priceless debt, 
To thee our praise will ever ring. 

Macon Moore. 



Forty -one 




THK-P1NE-KNOT 



JUNIOR 




Forty-two 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



p. 



r 



m 



Rose Tilghman 
Wilson, N. C. 

Rose is a combination of brains and fun. 
Does she skip classes? Does she brazenly 
use rouge and lipstick? Well, perhaps she 
does, yet she adds a deal to the intellectuality 
of the class. 



Hugh Ross 
Wilson, N. C. 

Earnestness, practicability, energy — these 
are Hugh's distinctive qualities. He meets 
his tasks with cheerful optimism and com- 
mon sense. 

"Success cornea to him who pays the price." 



{Catherine Morton 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Everybody loves Katherine because of her 
sympathetic nature, her gentle and kind 
manner. She is ever willing to work, and 
is a friend to all. 

"A merry heart nuiketli a cheerful 
Countenance." 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



mm 




Dillon Peele 
Everetts, N. C. 

"Wooly" is well known on A. C. Campus. 
His generosity may prove to be his greatest 
weakness. 

"For may ice search before we find 
A heart so manly and so kind." 



Eloise Bowers 
Pembroke, Ga. 

Eloise is one of Georgia's most beautiful 
peaches. A great part of her time is spent 
in training her voice; which no doubt, at 
some time will charm many more than it 
has already. If beauty and talent mean any- 
thing in life, she will reach the top. 



Reuben Banks 
Arapahoe, N. C. 

Reuben seems quiet and unobtrusive, but 
those who know him appreciate his dry 
humor. His efficiency as a Pianist and as 
Chaplain of the Paste Board and Ivory Club 
is quite rare. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Edna Wood 
LaGrange, N. C. 

The jolly Junior, and carefree LaGrangian 
is a necessary asset to our college. We 
could not do without her. She has a special 
liking for one of the "Frats," but that does 
not keep her from being one of our popular 
students. Edna is as plain as an old shoe, 
is the same to all, and never tries to show 
her dimples. She is a great shark in many 
phases of college life; for instance: loving, 
studying, mastering languages, and playing 
pranks. 

"They most live who most love." 



JoiIX WlXFIELD 

Pantego, N. C. 

Tall and lanky John has a careless way 
and does not hurt himself studying, but 
can appear quite "knowy" in class. Although 
he has a hot temper he succeeds in making 
many friends. 




Mary Harper 
Wilson, N. C. 



To know Mary is to like her; to find her 
in bad humor is well nigh impossible. In 
school she appears quiet and studious, and 
is faithful to every duty. Her disposition 
is as sweet as her music. 

'To say little and perform much show the 
characteristics of a great mind.'' 







Forty-rive 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Junior Poem 

\ I T K stretch our hands toward tomorrow 

We se;-k to touch its golden edge, 
To learn the essence of its meaning, 
To seal its promise with a pledge. 




The things we learn today are stored away 
In our granary for tomorrow, 
To be a balance for too tickle joy, 
To serve as halm for sorrow. 

We seek to learn a little today 
For tomorrow is just over the hill, 
And the Juniors are breathless by trying 
Their pledge to the future to fulfill. 



^u A, 



y> 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Junior Impressions 




WE who compose the Junior Class are the chosen few; we are numbered Low 
in quantity, but high in quality. We have contributed so generously to the 
Sophomore and Senior Classes, and to the country at large that our band seems 
rather weak, but we hope to recruit it from these same sources next year, so that 
our class will be as large as the average graduating class. It is not quantity but. 
quality we plead. We do not want any half-made Seniors next year; we want our 
Junior reputation to follow us through the remainder of our college years. 

Well can we remember those Freshman days. It has been three long years, but 
they do not seem as long as the first night we were Freshmen. Everything was 
so dark and dreary, yet every one seemed to be having a good time. Each of us 
wondered if we were the only Freshman for every one seemed to know every 
one else. 

Every one seemed so deceitful that we thought the professor of religion was 
surely not tending to his business. Those "upper classmen," as they called them- 
selves, would smile at us in the day time and make impressions on us with the 
paddle at night — those were lasting impressions too. To speak the whole truth, 
those were the most lasting impressions we got during our Freshman year. 

Sophomore days were quite different. We were willing, but not anxious to return 
to our school routine. We were happy to remind ourselves that we were returning 
as Sophomores, and not as Freshmen; for we were not willing to live those days 
again. As days lengthened into weeks and weeks into months we grew more devoted 
to each crack in the ceiling and each scratch on the wall, until we earnestly said 
to ourselves that there could be no place like Atlantic Christian College and we 
would surely return the next year if it were possible. That year it began to dawn 
upon us what it was all about and we began to take our work more seriously. We 
impressed ourselves as being quite wise in those days, but we know now that we 
only thought we were, for Juniors are much wiser than Sophomores. 

Nineteen twenty-six finds us as Juniors. We have been unaware of the many 
impressions which we have received, but they have been made deeper and deeper 
as the months have rolled by. We find ourselves very much changed, and we know 
that it is because new impressions have broadened our experience; so we have 
developed into mature Juniors. The faces and buildings that were ugly at first 
sight have become dear to our hearts. The personal touch of the faculty and the 
homelike atmosphere of a Christian family have impressed upon us the social 
ideal of work and service. 





THE-PINEKNOr 



A Junior Tale 



/"^\H, say, let me tell you a tale that is true, 

^—' Of John and of Dillon and Reuben and Hugh, 

Lenian and Raymond and Edna and Rose, 

Have felt Cupid's darts, as every one knows. 

Just stand for five minutes down by the door, 

You'll prove that I'm saying — yes, even more. 

The Juniors' own song bird, Eloise B., 

Is often seen talking with athlete "C. D." 

Did I tell you of Raymond ? all quickly perceive it, 

He claims to love two, but no one believes it. 

Rose is attractive and yet, I've a hunch, 

She's the successful vamp of the bunch. 

There's Reuben, the silent, and Hugh, the good worker, 

Both will be heard from, for neither's a shirker. 

Dillon, with head full of business affairs, 

Has plenty of time left for love, he declares. 

Two Marys we have, both winsome and sweet, 

Models of Neatness from head to their feet. 

A Senior one fancies, but don't ever tell, 

The other a Freshman equally well. 

There's John and Louise, fair students, I'll say, 

Have loved one another for many a day. 

And Catherine has been here a short while we know, 

And yet she has already captured a beau. 

Leman and Edna, tho' mindful of "Moore," 

Miss never a chance to meet at the door. 

Their plans are quite made, they think it not strange 

To firmly believe they never will change. 

My story is told and this I'll allow, 

That lovers have loved from Adam until now. 




THE-PINEKNOT 




Mary Jones 
Grimesland, N. C. 

"To sum up all, be merry I advise. 
And while we are merry, we may still be 
ivise." 



Cecil Reel 
Arapahoe, N. C. 

"With lesser things never content, 
On the task ever bent." 

Courageous, Energetic, Constructive, link- 
able, Loving, Resolved, Enthusiastic, Elo- 
quent, and Liberal, spells Cecil Reel. 



Esther Ricks 
Pantego, N. C. 

"A perfect woman nobly plann'd 
To warn, to comfort, and command: 
And yet a spirit, still and bright, 
With something of an angel light." 



James Lawson 
Rural Hall, N. C. 

"Few things are impossible to diligence and 
study." 




THE-PINEKNOT 



Margaret Barnes 
Pinetops, N. C. 

"None kneiv her, but to love her, 
None named her, but to praise." 



Park Belangia 
Arapahoe, N. C. 

■Talk to him of Jacob's ladder and he will 
ask the number of rounds." 



Kate Bbinson 
Arapahoe, N. C. 

''Sweet is every sound 
Sweeter thy voice, but — 
Any sound from thee is sweet.' 



Lemax Bar.niull 

Everetts, N. C. 

"Measure not a man by his stature — 
Remember Napoleon was a small man.' 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



Violet Goodwin 
Washington, N. C. 

•Her eyes arc eyes of innocence and her 
voice is soft and siveet." 




Raymond Boucher 
Hoke, Ala. 

'Love for many, comes but once in a life 
time, but for me it is a week-end affair." 



Julia Belches 
Disputanta, Va. 

■Xol too serious, not too (jay. 
But altogether a jolly good girl." 



HlLlON WlNDLEY 

Pantego, N. C. 

'Noble, upright, with stately mcin. 
Yet, withal, a twinkle in liis eye.' 



THE-P1NEKNOT 



Helen King 
Whitakers, N. C. 

'The girl that can sing and iciU not sing 
should be sent to Sing Sing." 



Cecil Perkins 
Wendell, N. C. 

■Hang Sorrow! Care will kill a eat. 
Therefore let's be merry." 



Evelyn Huggins 
Sumter, S. C. 

•A little bud of loveliness that should never 
groin older." 



Harvey Brookbanks 

Stokesdale, N. C. 

'As the bright sun glorifies the sky. 
So his face is illumined by his eye.' 






THE-PINE-KNOT 




Eunice Aycook 
Lucama, N. C. 

'She is a maid whom we can but love ; 
Not wise as a serpent, but mild as a dove.' 



Margaret Sii.vkrtiiohnf. 
Lake Landing, N. C. 

■The girl who reins is the girl who works. 
The girl who toils while the next one 
shirks." 



Esther Cobb 
Elm City, N. C. 

'Not too sober, not too gay, but a true blue 
girl in every way." 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



The Truth About Four Years at College 

Oh talk not to me of the high Senior glory, 

For that is, my dear, quite another story. 

They are on the very topmost heights, you know; 

They're dashing here, rushing there, always on the go. 



While the Juniors are nonchalant, they're strong for sports; 
They copy all their term papers and fake reports. 
They have seen the Dean and been on probation; 
There is nothing left for them to learn in creation. 

If you want true opinion the very hardest pull 

Is getting by the first milestone. One must have a head full 

Of real sense to be a Soph, and Oh, Boy, life is sweet, 

It's great to realize; and not to be Frosh is a treat. 

I sure envy the mighty Seniors, and the Junior's naivete; 
But, Oh, my gracious! I'd lay me down and dee 
Before I would write one tiny word, by Gosh, 
In the praise of those poor silly, dumb, green Frosh. 




Fifty-five 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



I 



i 




Sophomore Impressions 

A SOPHOMORE 

AH! At last I am back on the old campus at A. C. C. What a great change 
has been wrought ! Two stumps and a clothes-line have been removed, which 
makes our six acres almost unrecognizable. Around the corner of the dormitory 
I get a glimpse of the faithful iron pump, which stands guard over the coal-pile. 
Fain would I see some shivering Freshman lave his pedal extremities in the chaste 
waters of this fount. Well do I remember the night when I was forced to manipu- 
late a scrubbrush on the cold feet of my unwilling partner in misery. These are 
but painful memories, however, which will enable me to steel my heart against the 
piteous outcry of some similar unfortunate. Verily, thus saith the Soph : "Venge- 
ance is mine." The rush and bustle of unpacking. 

"Who are you going to room with" — 

"I've got a Freshie— " 

"Have you signed up — " 
- "They wont let me take as many hours as I want to — " 

"That's a good one." 

"All right, .young man, I can give you two courses in Education. What else 
did you think of taking?" 

Our first meal in the dining hall. The Freshies wander in as though they were 
being led to slaughter. "Cheer up, Freshies, we have turkey for Thanksgiving." 
We discover with amazement that we still get beans and spuds. A tinkle of knife 
on glass — "There will be no visiting in the halls this afternoon." Feel better now — 
something to do right away. 

"Line up boys, and look 'em over." 

"Well, how do you rate that?" 

"Find out that last year's line wont work ?" 

"Date's over." 

"Let's go to the dormitory." 

Another full session in progress : 

"I don't see how she stood your hug." 
"Boy! she was a peach." 
"That was some date." 
And so, far into the night. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



DlXIE BOSWELI 

Wilson, N. C 




Edna Alford 
Wilson, N. C. 



Cecil Jakman 
Richlands, N. C. 



Adtr Barnes 

Lucama, N. C. 



Bonnie Belle Windham 
Farmville, N. C. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



■ 



I 



Elizabeth Moore 
New Bern, N. C. 



Lois Johnson 
Durham, N, C. 



Monroe Fdlghum, (Soph. 
Wilson, N. C. 



Lessie Banks 
Arapahoe, N. C. 



Myrtle Gardner 
Macclesfield, N. C. 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



Robert Grady 

Seven Springs, N. C. 



Daisx Crisp 

Macclesfield, N. C. 



Hilda Whitley 
Pantego, N. C. 



Gertrude Flowers 
Wilson, N. C. 



Mabel Amerson 
Wilson, N. C. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Mary Mattox 
Meldrim, Ga. 



Pauline Cox 
Belhaven, N. C. 



James Smith 

Wilson, N. C. 



Sallie Mae Smith 
Farmville, N. C. 



Neva Banks 
Arapahoe, N. C. 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



Fbances Boyette 
Lucama, N. C. 



Calina Smith 

Wilson, N. C. 




Marsden Wiggins 
Goldsboro, N. C. 



Ethel Morgan 

Stokesdale, N. C. 



Liixie Mae Whorton 

Oriental, N. C. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 




While There Is Life There Is Hope 

(Freshman Poem) 

We are the Freshmen of '29, 
Poor, dumb, green, we're told, 
You know that ancient line 
The Sophs hand us for being bold. 

But we have lost to compensate, t 
About our many woes we'll never whine; 
But just you wait, we'll graduate, 
You'll see in nineteen twenty-nine. 

And there will come a time, ah then ! 
We will sigh over memories sweet and good 
Of the class of '29 at A. C. C. when 
Others laughed and misunderstood. 

Freshman days are too bitter-sweet to last. 
It remains for us to keep our light shining 
And remember Fresh days will soon be in the past, 
For every cloud has its silver lining. 

Lois Johnson. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Freshman Impressions 



Wilson. INT. C, Septembe 



Dear Old Shack : 

I know you will be surprised to hear from an old shipmate ; but, woe betide my 
bones, I must have some one to tell my troubles to. You always told me that if 
I cultivated my brain I would make a good farmer, and that is why I am here 
at this institution for the uplift of undernourished gray matter; a bubble in a 
bucket of soap, a froth on a millpond, a Freshman in college. My troubles are 
many, my triumphs are few, and I am almost a total wreck on the jagged rocks 
in a vast sea of swirling knowledge and foaming philosophy. Not only that but — 
Oh, drat these Sophomores. 

"Life is real, 

Life is earnest. 

Life is but a fitful dream; 

A Sophomore gets you by the trousers, 

Then things are not just what they seem." 




With apologies to the good poet of course, I've forgotten his name, 
sentiments; here are some more by yours truly of the briny deep. 
"The 23d Psalm of the Freshman," but you can call it what you like 



Them's my 
I named it 



"The Sophomore is my master. 

My wounds do smart; 

He maketh me to lie down and wrestle with my imagination. 

He leadeth me by my eyebrows. 

He rippeth my pants; 

He forceth me to labor for his name's sake. 

Yea, though I roll a peanut down the middle of Nash Street, 

I will gain me no respite for he is behind me; 

His rod and his paddle belabor me. 

Thou preparest for me an axle grease pie in 

classmates; 
Thou anointest my head with apple sauce, 
Whilst cold water runneth over my feet, 
Surely trials and tribulations shall follow me 

Freshman, 
And I shall dwell in fear and misery forever." 



the presence of my 



the days I'm 



Huh? Yes, I just heard the bell ring. 
I'll just hang my clothes on this line. 





I sure did; and today is wash day, so 

Your old shipmate, 

Ima Freshmax. 




THE- PINE-KNOT 



c 



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Freshman A B C's 

Is for alphabel and Adam as you perceive. 
Two tilings tn lie learned before we leave. 

Is for ability above all others. 

Possessed only by Freshman, sisters and brothei 



Is for affection that we have for home sweet home, 
A feeling that will make us never want to roam. 

Is for bells that ring morning, noon and night. 
We have to obey them, he it wrong or right. 

Is for beauty, which none id' us lack, 
.For using a compact we all have a "knack." 

Is for hall, in which the Freshmen shine, 
Football, basketball — all down the line. 

Is for Calendar, which each Freshman knows. 
For be counts eaeh day as it goes. 

Is for our campus, which is not very wide; 
Rut smaller it seems when wo can't step outside. 

Is for checks, we wish we had more. 

When "Dad" does not send them Ave get awful sore 






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THE-PINEKNOT 




Ivy May Smith. B.M. 
Director of School of Music 



Elm a. V. Stark, B.M. 
Professor of Voice 



Graduate In Piano 

Linda Lee Clanton 
Teachers' Diploma 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Dreams, Dreams, Dreams! 

IN" Plato's Dialogues upon the immortality of the soul, he quotes Socrates as 
saying that forms visited him repeatedly in dreams saying, "Socrates, apply 
yourself to and practice music." 

Dreams are the soul of great Art. The artist who has never dreamed has never 
soared to Elysian Heights. It is the dream, the inner-seeing, that enters the being 
of the creator and the interpreter and seems to carry him to higher levels. In this 
progressive age, we have no sympathy with any system of musical instruction 
that suppresses dreams. The only value whatsoever that the hard and necessary 
grind of technique has is to make the dreams of the artist come true. A great many 
of the most beautiful things in music are clothed in the fabric of dreams. Almost all 
of the great works of musical art have come from dreams. 

One of those passing rainbow dreams, 
Half light, half shade, which fancy's beams 
Paint on the fleeting mists that roll 
In trance or slumber, round the soul! 

Ah ! rare Thomas Moore, how beautifully you dreamed those lines. Kill the 
dreams of youth, and the flower of art withers as if touched by icy blast. Perhaps 
the greatest teacher is the one who inspires the greatest dreams, and then shows 
the student how to work to realize them. 

"I believe it to be true that dreams are the true interpreters of our inclination; 
bu there is art required to sort and understand them." And again, "There are 
thousands of dreamers in music who might do well to dream the dream of Socrates, 
'appreciation and practice.' " 




Seventy -one 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 



Ensemble Club 



Miss Smith 
Miss Starr 

Mary Harper, President 
Mary Jones, Treasurer 
Linda Clanton, 
Yiee President 

Eloise Bowers, Secretary 

Mw Reel 

Nannie Pearl Qiinehly 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Erxn e Aycock 
Li i in: Lee 
Kate Brinson 
Margaret Barnes 
Calena Smith 
Moses Moye 
Harvey Underwood 
Hortense Lewis 





Hilton Windley 

Macon Moore 
Louise Tomlinson 
Helen King 
James Lawson 
Ethel Morgan 
Sarah Askew 
Cecil Jarman 



Mb 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
Eva Webb Paul Southard 

Helen Transou Myrtle Gardner 

Same Mae Smith Ruth Johnson 

Lessie Banks Reuben Banks 

Janie Manning Cecil Perkins 



i 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 






Choral Club 

Ei.oisk Bowers President 

Moses Movk Vice President 

Kate Bkinson Secretary and Treasurer 

Elma Starr Director 

Nanxki.lk Hinton Accompanist 

Sojjranos 

Katf. Brinson Macon Mookk Helen King 

Eloise Bowers Mary Harper Ethel Morgan 

Eunice Aycock Annie Harper Myrtle Gardner 

Mary Jones Sara Askew 

Altos 
Lessie Banks Esther Ricks Daisy Crisp 

Hattie Mae Ricks Mrs. Perry Cask Lii.i.ie Lee 

Vivian Ghieein 

Tenors 
Moses Moye Cecil Jarman 

Hilton Windley Mr. Perry Cask 

James Smith 

Bass 
Raymond Boucher James Lawson 

Harvey Underwood Reuben Banks 

Pail Southard 

Seventy-three 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Recital 

Friday Evening, December 4, 1925 

PROGRAM 

Hail! "Orpheus Hail!" R. E. De Reef 

"Honey Town," [Plantation Lullaby. 1 Stanley Widener 

Choral Club 

Gavotte, D Major, Opus. 16 Pi rani 

JIaruaret Barnes Lessie Banks 

"Souvenir ot' Love".... - P. Di dla 

Helen Kink 

Dance of the Doll - Poldini 

Lessie Banks 

"The Bird and the Rose" Amy Horroek 

Vivian Griffin 

"Song of the Pirate" Montague Ewing 

Raymond Boucher 

Gondoliers, Opus. 41 Moszkowski 

Margaret Barnes 

"Welcome Pretty Primrose" Giro Pinsuti 

Eloise Bowers 

Anitra's Dance Grieg 

'Sparks" Moszkowski 

Mart Harper 
Waltz A Flat Major Chopin 

Li NLA Cl.ANTON 

"Ah I I Have Sighed to Rest Me" | II Trovatore] Verdi 

Moses Move 

"Norma" Opus. 21 _ Bellini 

Mary Harper Linda Clan ton 




Recital 
Monday Evening, May 24, 1926 



PROGRAM 



C. M. von Weber 



"Jubel Overture," Opus. 24 

Marharkt Barnes Lessie Banks 

Waltz in C sharp Minor - Chopin 

Mary Eva Webb 

"Were I n Kins" Oley Speaks 

Hilton Windley 

Mazurka, Opus. 24, No. 2 Lesch.et.izky 

Lessie Banks 

"The Cull ins Winds" H. B. Gaul 

Helen King 

Arabesque, Opus. 61 Ohaminade 

Mary Jones 

"Tlu> Sea Hath Pearls" Pr. Kiicker 

Luis Johnson 

Mignon -Polonaise Schytte 

Margaret Barnes 

"The House by the Side of the Road" K. S. Clark 

Moses Move 
Novellette in Druajor _ A ^ MacDoweU 



Polonaise in E Minor 
"To Sprin 




Mary Harper 

; C. Gounod 

Eloise Bowers 

Hungarian Rhapsody, No. G , Liszt 

Linda Clanton 

"The Sword of Ferrara" P. P. Billiard 

Raymond Boucher 

"William Tell" Overture Rossini 

Linda Clanton Mary Harper 



Seventy-five 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 




Eloise Bowers of Vocal Department 

in 

Junior Recital 

Tuesday Evening, April 13, 1926 

PROGRAM 

I 

Nymphs and Shepherds Henry Purcell 

II 

The Silver King C. Chaminade 

Creation's Hymn L. van Beetlnm-u 

III 

[leading 

IV 

Welcome Pretty Primrose Pincuti 

My Songs of Love Reynaldo Hahn 

Tile Violet W. A. Mozart 

He is Good, He is Kind J. Masrenet 

V 

April Rain Huntington Wooil 

I"ve Been Roaming — Charles E. Hern 

By the Weeping Waters Thurlow Lien ranee 

Reading 

VI 

To Spring ('. Gounod 

Faculty Voice Recital 

Tuesday Evening, October 27, 1925 

Elma Vera Stark. Soprano 

Nannelle Hinton, Accompantit 

Edward Stallings, Violiniftl 

PROGRAM 

I 

Come Unto Those Yellow Sands Frank La Forge 

From "Tin- Tempest" by Shakespeare 

Bird of the Wilderness Horsman 

When Chloris Sleeps Homer Samuels 

II 

Der Schmied (The Blacksmith) Brahms 

Botschoft (The Message) Brahms 

Autumn I Oscar Weil 

Spring J 

Obligato by Mr. Stallings 
III 

Spanischer Tenz, Opus. 58 Rehlield 

Melody Dawes 

Mrs. Stallings at the Piano 

IV 

To a Hill Top Ralph Cox 

A Japanese Love Song May Brohe 

The Answer Robert Huntington Terry 

By the Waters of Minetonka Lieuranee 

Obligato by Mr. Stallings 
V 

In Italy Jeanne Boyd 

La Capinear (The Wren) J. Benedict 

Cantatas 

St'NDAy, December 13, I92."i 

The Promised Child Stutz 

Wednesday Evening, March 31, 1926 

The King of Glory Morrison 

The Choral Club 





THE-PINE-KNOT 




Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas, B.S. 



Head of Expression Department 



The Dramatic Club 



The Dramatic Club, this year, is composed of any students who wish to join. About 
one-half the members are students of the School of Expression. Unlike years hitherto, 
it does not have a president, a secretary, and a treasurer, but it has a very capable set 
of managers with Miss Annie Harper as Business Manager. 

The Club is doing its bit in every way possible this year. In January the Devereux 
Company came, under the auspices of the Dramatic Club, and gave two very enjoyable 
plays, 'The Merrie Monarch," matinee, and "The Barber of Seville," night. 

The Club is a member of the Carolina Dramatic Association and is hoping to take a 
one-act play to Chapel Hill for the contest. 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



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A Hint to Brides 

A Comedy in One Act 

By Ken yon Nicholson 

Cast of Characters 

Albert Fen ton James Lawson 

Irene (his wife) Esthej; Conn 

Larry (a burglar) Harvey Brookbank 

Flo (his co-worker) Ruth Johnson 




The Wonder Hat 

A Harlequimade 

By- Ben Hecht and Kenneth Sawyer Goodman 

Cast of Characters 

Harlequin Evelyn Huggins 

Pierrot Mks. Blanche Clark Bickers 

Punchinello Alma Mizelle 

Columbine Hattie Mae Ricks 

Margot Esther Ricks 



Will O' The Wisp 

By Don is F. Holm an 

Cast of Characters 

The White-faced Girl Edna Alford 

The Country Woman Mary Webb 

The Poet's Wife Elizabeth Moore 

The Serving Maid : Eunice Aycock 

The Work House Ward 

By Lady Gregory 

/ Harvey* Brook bank 

Michael Miskel < James Lawson 

( Ruth Johnson 




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THE-PINE-KNOT 



The Pine Knot 



A little while ago a pine tree lifted its head above the drab earth 
And patiently through dull years ot silence grew. 

A little while ago strong roots stretched downward into the earth 
And, seeking, drew living water from the rock. 

A little while ago and the red sap coursed upward 
Through gnarled and twisted branches toward the sun. 

A little while ago a vision to endure to the end through service, 
Since there is no dawn without its sunset-flare. 




A little while and yet there is not gloom enough in all the forest 
To hide the lamp of Him who has given all. 



Pine Knot Staff 



Nannie Pkari. Quinerly Editor-in-Chief 

Janie Manning - Assistant Editor 

Norwood Grady Business Manager 

Anderson Bos well Assistant Business Manager 

Macon Moore lAterary Editor 

Annie Harper Assistant Literary Editor 

Rose Tilghman Art Editor 

John Ross Assistant Art Editor 

Moses Move Athletic Editor 

Eloise Bowers ..Music Editor 

Mary Harper Assistant Music Editor 

Esther Bryant '. Dramatic Editor 

Mittie Wiggins Religious Editor 

Pail Southard Assistant Religious Editor 

Mae Reel Wit Editor 

Charles James Assistant Wit Editor 



Seventy-nine 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 



Phi Sigma Tau 



Colors: Black and Gold 



Fl.oWKl 



Motto : 



'Cor Unum, Via Una" 



SORORES IN URBE 





1912 


Mrs. 


H. P. MOSLEY 


Mrs. 


Paul E. Jones 


Mrs. 


WoRTHINGTON 


Henrietta Moye 




1913 


Mrs. 


Arthur White 


Mrs. 


George Tomlinson 



1914 
Mrs. E. S. Peel 
Mrs. Elsie Foxhall 
Ruth Hardy 
Annie Laurie Lang 

1915 
Mrs. Lucy Jones 
Charlotte Hodges 
Mrs. Samuel Lawrence 
Mrs. A. B. Windham 





1916 


Mrs. 


K. A. Stewart 


Mrs. 


Frank Sexton 


Mrs. 


Sultan Flowers 


Mrs. 


Byrd 


Mrs. 


Luther Tomlinson 




1917 


Mrs. 


Kate Price 


Grace Rice 


Lira Clay 


Mrs. 


Knott Proctor 




191S 


Hattie Moseley 


Helen Hudnell 


Lott 


ie Wilson 




1919 


Mrs. 


Irvin Winstead 


Leol 


a Saunders 


Mrs. 


Allen Moore 




1920 
Sallie Adams 
Anna Moorb 

1921 
Gladys Peele 

1922 
Rosa Pridgen 
Reua Stubbs 
Margaret Eagles 
Mrs. Lloyd Brinson 
Mrs. Paul Ricks 
Louise Harrison 

1923 

Mrs. M. T. Moyf. 
Mrs. James Manning 
Charlotte Ruth Sumhell 

1924 
Eloise Bowers 
Mary Etheiudge 
Ruby- Crockett 
Martha Harrison 

1925 
Caroline Johnson 
Ada Jarvis 
Esther Harrison 

1926 
Helen. Transou 
Mary Mattox 
Violet Goodwin- 
Esther Ricks 
Sallie Mae Smith 
Esther Cobb 
Eva Webb 
Annie Smith 



Eighty-two 





dEBMl 



Eighty-three 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Sigma Tau Chi 

Founded October 4, 1920 
Miss Ivy Mae Smith / 

MISS ANNETTE STEELE \ S ° r0nt V AdViSeTS. 




Colors: White and Gold 



Flowers: White and Yellow Chrysanthemums 
Motto: "Sumus Unum" 



Mhs. J. Allen Johnson 

Miss Maky Jones 
Miss Edna Wood 




Yell: 

Yi! Yi! Yi! 

Sigma Tau Chi. 

C. I.! Hoo Doo! 

So-ror-i-ti! 

1920 
Mhs. Charles C. White Miss Ruby Evans 

Miss Annie Ruth Jones Miss Amanda Ross 

Miss Mae Stancill Miss Rachel Bishop 

Mrs. Mar.iorie Grantham Gregory 

1921 
Mrs. Tom Gorman, Jr. Miss Lula Norris Cox 

Miss Evelyn Phillips 



1922 



1923 



Miss Eeeie Pridoen 

Miss Viola Freeman 
Miss Mae Reel 



1924 
Mrs. Rupert Phillips Miss Anna Ware 

Miss Nellie Fae Bahnhii.l 



Miss Eunice AYCOCK 
Miss Elizabeth Moore 



1925 
Miss Bonnie Belle Windham 
Miss Evelyn Huggins 




Colohs: White and (lulri 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Phi Kappa Alpha 



Founded September 28, 1925 



FRATER IN FACULTATE 
E. L. Pox 

CLASS OF 1926 
0. A. Boswell E. N. Grady 

Moses T. Mote 

CLASS OF 1927 
John Winfield Clem Banks 

CLASS OF 1928 
Cecil Reel Lkman Barnhill 

Ranny Muns Park Belanoia 

James Lawson 

SPECIAL STUDENT 
Milton- J. Moyk 




Flower: White Rose 




THE-PINE-KNCT 




The Y. W. C. A. 

Among the religions organizations of the college the most outstanding one in the 
heart of every girl is the Y. W. C. A. It is the only organization which the girls 
can call wholly their own. The girls meet each Sunday evening in a homelike room 
and worship just as they would at home with the family. This renews the bonds 
of home love and the nearness that we feel toward Christ. Each girl feels that she 
is a part of all the activities which are performed. All enjoy the weekly meetings 
and the socials, which we have occasionally. 

As each girl passes from this college a tender spot will he found in her heart, for 
her own Y. W. C. A. 

CABINET MEMBERS 

Nan nik Pearl Quinerly President 

Evelyn Huggins Vice President 

Mittik Wiggins Secretary 

Esther Bryant Treasurer 

Mae Reel Chairman Finance Committee 

Esther Ricks Chairman World Fellowship Committee 

Edna Wood Chairman Social Service Committee 

Ei.oise Bowers Chairman Social Committee 

Margaret Silvehthohne Chairman Publicity Committee 

Janie Manning Under-graduate Representative 

Mary Jones Chairman Program Committee 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 



H 



Religious Activities of the Boys 




THE College places its emphasis on religion, the predominant and outstanding 
activity in life. If feels that religion is the nucleus around which all the 
organizations cluster. In fact it is the very essence of our school life. One is im- 
pressed by the religious atmosphere in and about the college. The opportunity of 
coming in contact with a ( Ihristian faculty and a large number of ministers is one 
that is especially appreciated by a student body that comes largely from homes 
which have high christian ideals. About thirty of these students are preparing to 
preach. 

Jn such an environment one naturally finds various religious organizations as, 
the Fellowship, Boys' Prayer Meeting, Religious Education Committee, Christian 
Endeavor, and Bible School. These organizations give a boy an opportunity to 
express himself, and a chance to work to become a religious leader. The depart- 
ment of religious education offers him the opportunity to equip himself formally 
for a leader and a minister. 

The Fellowship Club is an important center from which religious training and 
inspiration radiate. The membership is composed of all those students who plan 
to do definite religious work. Students and faculty members spend a profitable hour 
once a week in discussions pertaining to religious work. In the Wednesday evening 
prayer meetings the student may enjoy a period of consecration and learn how to 
conduct such a meeting. The religious education committee composed id' a rep- 
resentative from each religions organization, ami which cooperates with the 
department of religious education, brings a leading speaker of the brotherhood of 
the Disciples of Christ to us each year for a course of lectures. These are a few 
of the religious organizations that share in the work of A. ( '. ( '. in development of 
effective Christian leaders. 



€y^_?f) 



THE-PINE-KNOT 



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Fellowship Club 

Hilton Windley President 

I.. J. Bickers Vice President 

P. C. Southard Secretary 

MEMBERS 

James Lawson Roe L. Harris 

John Croom Raymond Boucher 

Charles James Henry Stilley 

William Minshew Pail Parker 

H. LeRoy Harriss Harvey Brookbank 

Mr. Hilley Moses Moye 

Mr. Case Mr. Grim 

Mr. Mattox 



Ninety-one 




p 



Boys' Prayer Meeting 



Raymond Boucher 
Paul Parker 
Perry Case 

H. S. HlLLEY 

James Lawson 
Cecil Jakman 
Paul Southard 
William Minshew 
Charles James 



Moses Move 
Hilton Windi.ey 
Walter Randolph 
John Bickers 
Harvey Brookbank 
H. LeRoy Harris 
John Ross 
Cecil Reel 
W. T. Mattox 





Religious Education Committee 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. Case, Chairman Mr. Hilley 

Prof. Mattox Mr. Barclay 

Prof. Grim Miss Harper 

STUDENT MEMBERS 

Elizabeth Moore Y. W. C. A. 

Esther Ricks Student Body 

Moses Moye Student Body 

LeRoy Harriss Fellowship Club 

James Lawson Boys' Prayer Meeting 





Education Club 

FIRST SEMESTEK 

Janie Manning President 

Mittie Wiggins Vice President 

Margaret Silverthorne - Secretary 

Macon MOORE Trraxtirrr 

Charles James, Mary Harper, Mae Reel Program Committee 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Moses Move President 

Macon Moore ..Vice President 

Annie Harper Secretary 

Anderson Boswell Treasurer 

Nannie Pearl Quinkrly, I- J. Bickers, 

Leroy Harris Program Committee 

MEMBERS 

Mr. f, V. Grim Helen King 

I, ii. i. ik Lee Nannie Peari. Quinerly 

Macon Moore Annie Harper 

Mary Jones . Janie Manning 

Mittie Wiggins Anderson Boswkll 

Mrs. Perry Case Margaret Silverthro 

Mae Reel Norwood Grady 

Kate Brinson Charles James 

LESSIE Banes Moses MOYE 

Mary Harper Ij. J. Bickers 

LeRoy Harris Edna Wood 

Esther Ricks Evelyn Huggins 




THE-PINE-KNOT 





Scribblers Club 



Ro.SE TlLGIIMAN 

Mittie Wiggins.. 



President 

Secretary 



MEMBERS 

Nannie Pearl Quinekly Loxjisb Stubbs 

Janie Manning Mae Reel 

Esther Bryant Annette Steele 





Dramatic Club 

Mrs. Mamie Jennings Lucas Director 

Annie Harper Business Manager 

PRODUCTION STAFF 

Mrs. L. J. Bickers Stage 

Raymond Boucher Lighting 

Mary Mattcix Property 

Esther Cobb Costume 

Alma Mizelle Make-up 

Miss Fannie Harper Play Reading 

Eloise Bowers Music 



Edna Alford 
Eunice Aycock 
Esther Bryant 
Mrs. L. J. Bickers 
Harvey Brookbank 
Esther Cobb 
Daisy Crisp 
Evelyn Huggins 
Annie Harper 



MEMBERS 
Ruth Johnson- 
James Lawson 
Mary. Mattox 
Alma Mizzle 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Melba Gay- 
Mary Webb 
Margaret Silver.thor.nb 



Mittie Wiggins 
Cecil Jar.man 
Hilton Windley 
Raymond Boucher 

Cora Lee Osborne 
Mary Eva Webb 
Eloise Bowers 
Elizabeth Moore 
Esther Ricks 





1 



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D. D. Club 



Coloh.s: Black and Red 

MllTTO 



Flower: Red Poppy 
"Wear a Rainbow Around Your Troubles" 

YELL! 
A-Rah! A-Rah! A-Ree! 
We're nifty, don't you see! 
We may raise a fuss, 
But loyal — that's us, 
We're the D, D.'s of A. C. C. 



MEMBERS 
Linda Claxton, "Playing D. D." Mary Mattox, "Teasing D. D." 

Maky Jones, "Smiling D. D." Violet Goodwin. "Flirting D. D." 

Eloise Bowers, Sentimental, D. D." Annie Smith, "Coquettish D. D.' 

Mary Eva Webb, "Dressing D. D." Esther Cobb, "Fussing D. D." 

Cora Lee Osborne, "Talking D. D." Hilda Whitley, "Loud D. D." 








I 

I 



YELL! 
Rack-a-chick-a-Boom ! 
Rack-a-chick-a-Boom ! 
Rack-a-chick-a ! Rack-a-chick-a ! 
Boom! Boom! Boom! 
Rip! Rah! Ree! 
Rip! Rah! Ree! 
A No. l's,' A No. l's 
A. C. C. 



Mae Reel... 
Edna Wood.. 



President 

.Secretary and Treasurer 



CLUB MEMBERS 



Mae Reel 
Edna Wood 
Elizabeth Mookb 
Bonnie B. Windham 



Ruth Johnson 
Helen TrANSOU 
Alma Mizelle 
Mary Webb 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



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"Furriners" Club 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. A. R. Moore Georgia 

Ei.oise Bowers Georgia 

Henrietta Ruhsenberger Indiana 

Annette Steele Kentucky 

Evki.yn Higgins South Carolina 

Julia Belthes Virginia 

William Minshew. Florida 

E. L. Pox Indiana 

Mrs. E. L. Fox -Indiana 

Cora Lee Osborne South Carolina 

Mary Mattox Georgia 

Linda Clanton Georgia 

Raymond Boucher Alabama 



AA 



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One Hundrnd Thn>o 



,s 




THE-PINE-KNCT 



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Inter-Scholastic Debate 

APRIL 10, 192fi 
Resolved, That the Federal Government should control and operate the coal mines. 



A. C. C. College 
Affirmative 
James Thomas Lawson 
Moses Tyson Moye 
Caswell Anderson Boswei.i. 



University of Pittsburgh 
Negative 

NoKMAN MANTIS 

Fred Hamlin 
Leon Shapiro 



jtCvy A 



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Alethian Literary Society 

FIRST SEMESTER 

.1 anie Mannino President 

Annie Harper V ice President 

Esther Ricks Secretary 

Mary Harper Treasurer 

Moses Moyk Critic 

Mary Jones I' in nisi 

Pat i. Parker... Chaplaiv 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Moses Mo ye President 

Est he:: Bryant Vice President 

El nick Ay cock Sec re I nr a 

Paul Southard - Treasurer 

John Win field Critic. 

Mary Harper Pin nisi 

Harvey Brook ha n k Clin plain 



Eunice Aycock 

Edna Ai.foud 
Leman Baknhill 
Esther Bryant 
Harvey Brookbank 
Daisy Crisp 
Pauline Cox 
Monroe FuLGHUM 
Myrtle Gardner 
Melha Gay 
Sadie Greene 
Vivian Griffin 
Annie Harper 
Mary Harder 



ROLL 1925-26 
LeRoy Harriss 
Cecil J arm an 
Lois Johnson 
Mary Jones 
Hortense Lewis 
To.m.mie Leahy 
J an ie Mannino 
William AIinsiiew 
Aim a Mizeli.e 
Elizabeth Moore 
Macon Moore 
Ethel Morgan 
Milton Move 
Moses Moyk 




Paul Parker 
Esther Ricks 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
John Ross 
Galena Smith 
Sai.lie Mae Smith 
James Smith 
Paul Southard 
Henry Stii.i.ky 
Margaret Sii.vkri iiohm: 
Mary Webb 
John Winkiei.I) 
Edna Wood 
Bonnie Belle Windham 



I 



John Winkiki.d 



DEBATERS 
■ Pai 



Southard 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



CHAPLAIN 



PRES. 




VICE -PRE.S. 




TREAS. 

FIRST SEMEISTELR 



VICE-PRES. 





TR.E1AS. 




CRITIC 




SEC. 




CRITIC 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



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Hesperian Literary Society 

FIRST SEMESTER 

.Van. nil Pearl Quinerly. President 

E. NT. Grady Vice President 

Mae Reei Secretary 

auks Lawson Treasurer 

Mittie Wiggins Chaplain 

Evelyn Huggins Critic 

Violet Goodwin Pianist 

Harvey Underwood and 

Raymond Boucher Cheer Leaders 

Eloise Bowers Song Leader 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Anderson Bosweli President 

Mittie Wiggins Vice President 

Eloi.se Bowers Secretary 

Hilton Windley Treasurer 

James Lawson Chaplain 

Mrs. John Bickers Critic 

Linda Glanton Pianist 




Sarah Askew 
Raymond Boucher 
Reuben Banks 

John Bickers 
Mrs. John Bickers 
Anderson Bosweli, 
Alton Belangia 
Clem Banks 
Ei.oi.se Bowers 
Adis Barnes 
Margaret Barn 
Lessie Banks 
John Croom 
Esther Cobb 
Linda Clanton 
Lucille Dike 



ROLL 1925-26 

Gertrude Flowers 
Norwood Grady 
Nona Godwin 
Violet Goodwin 
Robert Grady 
Evelyn Huggins 
Ciiari.es James 
Ruth Johnson 
Helen King 
James Lawson 
Lii.i.ie Lee 
Ran ny Munn 
Mary Mattox 
Robert Manning 
John Morton 
Nannie Pearl Quinerly 



Cora Lee Osborne 
Walter Randolph 
Hugh Ross 
Cecil Reel 
Mae Reel 
Louise Stubbs 
Annie Smith 
Walter Sadler 
Sue Elma Taylor 
Harvey Underwood 
Hilton Windley 
Mittie Wiggins 
Eva Webb 
Hilda Whitley 
Marsden Wiggins 
Lili.ie Mae Whobton 





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Literary Sisters 




ACT I 
Scene: College Campus. 
Time: Early Fall 1926. 
Characters : Miss Hesperian, 
Miss Alethian. 

MISS Alethian .seated on a bench under a tree. She is dressed in a blue and gold party frock. 
Enter, Miss Hesperian dressed in a red and white sport costume. 

MiSS HESPERIAN: Oh! pardon me; I didn't know any one was here. Bui I just as well pour out my 
Ihots to you as to meditate over them myself. Are you going to the society reception tonight? 

Miss A. : Yes. don't you see I am h11 dressed up in my party-frock ? 

Miss H. : That's the stuff. Watch me and you will be a regular go-getter. Nnw I expect to get 
the members because I've studied my system — know how to be breezy and friendly toward the poor, dumb 
Freshies — and I win, 

Miss A. ; Oh I'm so sick of this trade school tendency in education. 1 1 even i*eaehes the extra 
curriculars like us. You're intrigued by it. You just neglect the* sound, old classical literary study that 
builds character and comprehension of the world we live in. and give all your attention to jazz and 
yelling. 

Miss H. ; Ah. apple sauce, don't you know you can win debates with yelling .' Get the members and 
the pep, then you'll be able lo strut your stuff. 

MiSS A.: But you have no idea how this new-fangled stuff annoys me. I just can't allow the driving 
and forcing of students. . 

Miss H. : Listen: let's go on and have the reception together, like it was lalst year. It's lots morte 
sociable and friendly that way. 

Miss A.: No, I don't want to do that I think there should be competition. Of course it would make 
it easier, but the way to start the fun of fussing among the students it* to have two receptions. 

Miss H. : Oh well, course you would assume that high and haughty air with me. Well, so long. 
Old Dear, I got t' get busy. Bet you a coca-cola I get more members than you do. 

Miss A.: Why, really you know, I don't drink coca-cola. 

Miss H.: Well good-bye, Ice plant. (Exit.) 

Miss A.: She has the most atrocious manners. It's really too bail there is no one else 
much around here for me to associate with. If she doesn't find out what an attractive party I'm going to 
have tonight I'll get ahead of her yet. Oh such divine eats, such a good program — just full of snap and 
pep. It's most certainly a bore to have to appear so proper every time Old Hes comes around. When 
it comes to members, I'd be willing to bet her a case of ginger ale that I'll get both qualily and quantity 
this year. 

SCENE II 
Turlington & Morrison Drug Store, 1927 

Enter Mr. and Mrs. Alton Belangia. 

Miss H. : Hello! hello I both of you. Just in time for the big doings tonight. Ye]', we're going to 
have a regular party. I've been flying my colors for a week and we've got the old pep. 

Mr. B. : Going to make a clean sweep this year, eh I 

Mrs. B.: Oh, hush, Alton, you know she is. 

Miss H. : Folks, you know I'm the red-hot stuff this year. It just tickles me to deatli to see Miss 
Alethian so gotten away with. You know she always wears those sober colors — blue and gold. She 
says they are the sign of loyalty and work untold. You know what I think, don't you.' She had better 
show the goods and not so many; signs, Never you mind, honey. I'm going to< give a party tonight, the 
like of which A. C. College has never known, and she hasn't a whisper of it. You're coming aren't you .' 

Mr. and Mrs. B.: You bet! 

SCENE II 
Palace of Sweets, the same afteruoon 

Miss A. seated at thd table. 

Enter Mr. and Mrs. Leman Barnhill. 

Miss A.: Say, folks, come and have a lemonade. 

Mr. B.: Look, Edna, there's Miss Alethian. 

Mrs B. : Well, above all things, what are you doing down here .' 

Miss A.: I'm just resting a minute while I collect my thoughts. Look! There stands Miss Hesperian. 
She just gives me a tit with her loud manner and gaudy colors. I suppose she would wear red and 
white to a funeral. Her continual chatter, chatter, just drives me wild. I'm going to give her a setback 
tonight though. She will be blue one time when she discovers my plan. I have kept the matter very quiet so 
she will have no suspicion of such a thing. It grieves my poor heart to think such a situation exists. 
I pray that some time we can rest together in heaven. Since you are in town well surely expect you at 
the party tonight. 

Mr. and Mrs. B.: You know you can always count on these loyal Alethians. We'll come early and 
help you all we can. 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



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Athletics 




AC. C. has been dreaming of the time when she would he able to put a winning 
team in all the sports, and from the record of this year's football and basket- 
hall squads it looks as though her dream has been realized. Never before in the 
history of the College has interest and enthusiasm been more prominent, and it is 
our belief that A. C. C. has finally come to realize that clean and successful sports 
are necessary for the upbuilding of any wide-awake college or university. 

We do not plead for sports as an end, but as a means to an end. May A. C. C. 
never be satisfied with inferior equipment in material or men ; for she deserves the 
best that time and talent can provide. 

Next year should show a higher water mark in athletics than the past, since all 
the men on this year's teams are eligible for the teams next year. 

_ The football season was the most successful one that A. C. C. has ever had. 
There were four victories and three defeats. The sport writer of the News and 
Observer staff classified us as being equal to any small college in the State. The 
squad was composed of Boucher (Capt.), Munn, Brinkley, Riggan, Dunn, Barnes, 
Banks, Brookhanks, Blow, Reel, Fulghum, Winfield, Windley, Wiggins, 
Ross, Manning, and Herring. 

The basketball team has won numbers of victories ; they have been defeated but 
once on the home floor. They have won in competition with such teams as Oak 
Ridge, Catawba, Rocky Mount "Y," Fort Bragg and Ayden Seminary. The same 
boys are eligible for next year's team; and, due to this fact, we should be in a 
position to put out an even better team next year. This year's squad was composed 
of Munn (Capt.), Riggan, Brinkley, Fulghum, Dunn, Herring, Reel, Ross, and 
Blow. 

The baseball team should far surpass anything A. C. C. has ever had ; for we 
have for this year's team some of the best material in the State. When the call for 
practice comes in March such notable characters as Roma Boykin, Brinkley, Rig- 
gan, Fulghum, Morton, Barnhill, Reel, Belangia, Winfield, Lawson, Boswell, Bowen, 
Mercer, Munn, Dunn, and Eatmon will be seen upon the diamond in A. C. C. 
uniforms.. 





Athletic Association Officers 

John Winfield President 

Mae Reel Vice President 

Esther Bryant Secretary 

Moses Move Treasurer 

Moses Mo ye Manager Football 

Norwood Grady Manager Basketball 

Moses Moye Manager Baseball 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



A. C 
A. C 



C. 

C 

C. 

C. 
A. C. 0.. 
A. C. C. 




New Bern 6 

Fort Bragg 14 

2 Catawba 

Wilmington Light Inf 7 

24 17th Field Artillery 

19 Elon 

C. C 12 Blackstone M. 1 6 

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

C 37 Rocky Mount "Y" 32 

C 30 Rockv Mount "Y" 20 

C 20 N. C. State 37 

32 Catawba 23 

C 20 Oak Ridge 30 

C 18 Guilford 40 

C 34 Oak Ridge 30 

C 27 F. W. Baptist Sem 20 

C 27 Williamston "Y" 17 

C 52 Goldsboro "Y" 33 

C 13 Carolina "Y" 26 

C 45 Wilson "Y" 12 

C 37 Catawba 20 

C 62 F. W. Baptist Sem 22 

C 21 Wake Forest Fresh 36 

C 32 Fort Bragg 23 

C 61 Goldsboro "Y" 20 

45 Rockv Mount "Y" 25 

27 Rocky Mount "Y" 41 



640 



517 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



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: - ■ 







Class in Physical Education 



Varina Woodard. 



Director 



Lessie Banks 
Sallie Mae Smith 
Cai.ina Smith 
Esther Ricks 
Hattie Mae Ricks 
Evelyn Hcggins 
Pauline Cox 
Margaret Sii.vertiiorne 
Helen Transou • 
Lii.i.ie Mae Wiiorton 



Ethel Morgan 

Myrtle Gardner 

Dixie Boswell 

Edna Alford 

Neva Banks 

Bonnie Belle Windham 

Cora Lee Osisorne 

Ei.oise Bowers 

Eva Webb 

Helen King 



Mahy Mattox 



One Hundred Eighteen 



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One Hundred Nineteen 




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PERMANENT 



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ANOTHER WONOER 




THE-PINE-KNOT 






^cultyWives 

»1*\Iand 

HILDREN 








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One Hundred Twenty -three 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 



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Habebunt Lumen Vitae 

T IFE is ours. It is of primary interest to man in the light of both plant and animal; 
*-* and it is our duty, as promoters, to exert every possible human effort to make life 
broad and comprehensive. The most outstanding and essential need in the growth 
and development of plants and animals is sunlight; likewise, the soul of man needs 
spiritual light. 

The teachings of Christ are fundamental elements in the life of a christian, but 
what influence would the mere facts have upon the individual's life? To function suc- 
cessfully, these principles and teachings must not only be understood, but considered 
as well. We need light upon the spiritual side of life if the divine spark of love is kept 
alive in the human heart. Therefore, love and truth, the two most dominant factors 
in the teachings of Christ, are eternal and should be the guiding principles in every 
walk of human choice. They make possible strong personalities, which are needed as a 
panacea for sin and destruction, as such tends to prevail in the world of today. 

The College motto, "They shall have the light of life," satisfies our mindful hearts to 
the" end that our Creator is watching over and caring for us. This thought gives us 
inspiration and courage in our efforts to push forward and look life in the face with 
honesty, sincerity, and integrity. But an unlimited amount of individual effort must be 
expended in order to reach the purpose and goal of "Habebunt Lumen Vitae," which only 
a Christian institution can give by establishing the principles of love and truth in the 
hearts of men. And to accomplish this goal there must be interwoven in each heart the 
true attitude and supreme honesty in living; therefore, Atlantic Christian College, 
through its Religious and Educational Departments, strives, especially, to scatter the 
message of God to every nation and tongue by constantly impressing upon the minds 
of the students the loving kindness, the truthfulness of Christ, and the richness of his 
teachings. And as the students of this instiution pass out to the various fields to fight 
life's battle alone, may each and every one carry in his heart as a future guide that sacred 
and meaningful phrase, "Habebunt Lumen Vitae." 

MrrriE Wiggins. 




I 



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WwemSements 
BOOK 

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One Hundred Twenty-eight 




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THE-PINE-KNOT 



r- Legislative Candidates Targets 
Of Farmers' Union — Want. 
Efficient Schools 



lohn Winfield Alleged to Have 

Obtained Mow Under 

False Pretense. 



« aWJuiMB 1 






Lady 
"J— "Bill" 
Bu 



c °le SHU 



JToo</ Spends Sunday 
Joy-Riding On Boone Trail 



jorf Oonvict Blw Jnt" ' 



* n urn 




Ministers 
Are Ashamed Of 
Manning's Action 



(Special In Daily ffwa) 



' Says People Should Be Ones tol 
"»cide Entry Into War. 



SILK STOCKINGS CAUSE 
LILLIE MAE'S DOWNFALL 

Gets 30-Day Sentence From 
Recorder — 60 Days for Hurl- j 
ing Rocks at Youth. 



The lure of silk stockings was too 
much for tho resistance power of 



KJ.VO- BNTKIITAINS I 

'JllCKUAY L'AltD CLUU - 



Had Served Nearly Half of 

Terms for Manslaughter. 

Two Robeson Men Freed. 



iSEVF.F 



"5 



_ jays Elijah Did Not Know That 
_" He Was Anointing a Great i 
Prophet in Elisha 



REMEDY 



for 



HARVEY FINDS 
HE HAS ANOTHER JOB 



'.ED 
1DAY 

. With 

lome 



g-sters. Wade Hob*. 
In, Lindsay Moore and .. 
_^ivls, Bill Davis. Alley Blum 
I fc^tert Davis, Jr.. Wilson Blum and 
| WUIle Davis, all of Winston-Salem. 



Mrs. Monroe Entertains 

The Needlecraft Club 



HARRIS PROPOSES 
BETTER REPORTS 



Mrs, O. W, Monroe entertained 

members of th« Needlecraft club most 

delight full j- yesterday afternoon at 

her home on South MeDdenhall street, 

Varclsel and snapdragons were 

most ef etfvcly as decorations 

'A* -luslon of a pleasant 

"»on Folk and Mrs. 

'ed the hostess In 

*T4BdunftB 



Discusses Romance of Ruth 



owuncc 

ter. E 
Natha 
the t* 
and 
Care 



Wood, Escaped Convict, 
Captured Without Resistance 








THE-PINE-KNOT 



1 



Wit 



We band to you the old Pink Knot 
Which we hope you'll like a lot; 
Much time have we spent, 
On our quest for humor bent. 
And if you like it we shall be glad, 
For the small success we've hud. 

We hope that none will mistake 

For nothing personal must you take 

And if a reflection we seem to cast, 

Just remember that we love you till the last. 



Bickers: But I don't think I deserve an ab- 
solute D. 

Mr. Grim: Neither do I. but it is the lowest 
mark that I am allowed to give. 



Evelyn is so exact and precise 

You would think she liked things nice ; 

But she fell down 

On the hard ground 
And skinned her elbows twice. 



HARVEY: Mrs. Moore, would you lend me a 
cake of soap? Raymond's got the hiccoughs and 
I want to scare him. 



There was a young man named Boucher 
Who made all his girls say "oucber." 

When Alma came 'round 

He was spell-bound, 
Which made his girl say "I doubt y a." 



Ruth J.: I've just bad my hair shingled. 
John W. : What's the matter I Does your 
roof leak ? 



There is a young lady named Blackshear 
Her bicycle runs in high gear. 

To the college she rides it, 

To a pine tree she ties it, 
Of traffic laws she has no fear. 



We have a young English teacher named Steele 
Who looks like she's never bad a square meal. 

She's witty and sweet 

And she's hard to beat, 
Her work in our school is worth a great deal. 

Our religion comes from Case 
Who has a funnv face. 

He's fat 

I know that. 
But I'm sure he never will lace. 

All the coeds love the same man. 
It's Barclay, I understand. 

He's a minister I'm told, 

Yet rather bold, 
And drives his Chrysler as fast as he can. 



Our vampish young lady nanied Brown 
Spends most of her time down town. 

But men must be bolder 

In order to hold 'er 
Because she won't be tied down. 




There is a Pine Knot Bill 
They keep sending us st 
We will be in debt 
You can safely bet, 
For get it paid we never will 




There was a young man named Mtinn 
Who rode in a carriage for fun. 
Law-son fed him on milk 
And saw that none of it was spilt, 
Since to be a member of the Frat it had to 



The class was studying magnetism — 
"Hugh," asked Prof. Fox, "how many natural 
magnets are there?" 

"Two, Sir," was the surprising response. 
''And will you please name them?" 
"Blondes and brunettes, sir" — said Hugh. 



Of all the sad words of tongue or pen 
The saddest are these: "It's after ten." 



Ruth J. : You remind me of Venus de Milo 

Bashful Harvey: But I have arms. 

Ruth J. : Oh I have you, you don't use 'em 



A "sheik" is a young man who can keep his 
seat in a street car and flirt with the girl who is 
standing up. 

Anderson: Did you know the human body 
contains 40 per cent water and the amount of 
sulphur varies ? 

Janie: Oh! is that why some girls make better 
matches than others I 

,*« 

By all means, take unto yourself a wife, 
Some one to help you live your life. 

For three dollars and a dime. 
You can imarry any time, 
(If You have the line.) 

Have some one to help you blow your bubble 
To console you in time of trouble. 

But when the baby cries at four, 

And you have to get up and walk the floor, 

Remember me living singly as before 

In peace and happiness. 

And while you have but one to caress 

I must confess, 

I like variety, 

To see life is entirety. 



Roland B.: Did you know that cats bad elec- 
tricity in them ? 

John R. : Of course I did, if you put your 
head down close enough you can hear the trolly 
cars running. 



The Freshmen think they're it, 
But they give the rest of us a fit. 

They rip and rare 

They wont take a dare. 
But look at their reports and see what they "git." 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



Rot D.: Doctor, I fell on the gym floor and 
received infernal injuries. 

Dr. Bell: You mean internal injuries. In- 
fernal means lower regions. 

Roy D.: That's right doctor. 

J* 

Said Leman to Edna, "Oh, dear me," 

"I say the same" said she, 

"For you are my dear 

And I'm glad you are here 

To call yourself that, Tee-hee." 



We have a librarian named Silverthome, 
Way down Hyde, where she was born 

Its sloppy and wet, 

But the Hydonians don't fret. 
Because they have plenty of 'taters and corn. 

J* 

Eunice Aycock always seems the same 
But she will not always thus remain, 

For there's a Finch boy, 

Who considers it great joy, 
To know he will change her name. 

Upon the campus green, 

The sirls stand and preen. 

The boys with glossy hair, 

Stand and stare, 

Each hoping by some sign 

To know that they are in another's mind. 

Life is just a merry whirl, 
Sometimes whiskey, sometimes a girl. 

One half of life is a busy strife, 

The other half is meant, 

For pleasure and contentment. 

There are pleasures for which we crave 
And there are pleasures which lead us to our 
grave. 

So I say to you, 

As your days are few, 

Drink but little of old Home Brew I 

For every pleasure that we derive, 
But shortens the years that we survive. 

..* 

There are two girls who act quite silly, 
Some folks call them Kate and Lilly. 

They sing and play, 

The livelong day, 
But manage to keep on the good side of Hilley. 

.< 



Said Helen to LeRoy, 
"You are such a sweet b< 

But in reply 

He did but sigh, 
"To be young is great joy.' 



The rules of A. C. are so lenient 

That for boys and girls it is convenient 

To park on the steps 

And make their "reps" 
Although it is not expedient. 




There was a Senior named Esther 

With love for dates the good Lord blest 'er ; 

Each Sunday at seven 

She was in heaven, 
For the parlor seemed to rest 'er. 



The faculty of A. C. C. 
Are as dumb as can be. 

They make miany rules 

For obedient fools, 
Tli inking they are never broken, Tee-hee 



You see a pretty girl walking down the street. 
She is singular; you nominative. You walk 
across to her, you change to plural, then you be- 
come dative. You walk home with her. Her 
mother becomes accusative and you become im- 
perative. You kiss her and sbe becomes 
masculine. Things are tense, her father becomes 
present and you become a past principal. 

Making it Unanimous 
When I was a but a Freshman, 

And wandering around the quod, 
I used to think a Senior was 

The noblest work of God. 

I've since grown somewhat older, 

And my opinion is, 
That my opinion of him then 

Was just the same as his. 

— Baron Island In Columbia Jester. 

._< 

PROFESSOR GRIM'S FOOTBALL TEAM 

Thorndike, Manager F. F. Grim, Coach 

Line up for today's game 

University of Grind vs. A. C. College 

Betts Left End 

Dewey Left Tackle 

Kitson Left Guard 

Lot'KwoOD Center 

Foster Right CHwrd 

T.NGLTS Right Tackle 

Sandwick Right End 

Dearborn Left Halfback 

MC MURRAY Right Halfback 

Cuuberley full Back (Capt.) 

McDougaj.l Quarterback 

Subs 
UIil, center ; Whipple, quarter ; Adams, left 
half; May, right half; James, full back; Lyman 
and Hinsdale, ends; Bagley and Balton, tackles; 
Lane and Richardson, guards. 

Yell: 
All star book- worms, 
All star book- worms, 
All star book-worms, 
FIGHT, FIGHT, FIGHT! 
Team, team, team I 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



Today's Ettaket 

(Revised and enlarged for Atlantic Christian College 




Preface: "The customs of social life need frequent restatment and adaptation to 
new needs. They are customs because they are the best rules of conduct that have been 
garnered from experiences of succeeding generations under common conditions. A 
knowledge of these social customs will unlock to any man or woman doors of success, 
profit and real happiness without which they would have remained forever closed." 

CHAPTER I 
How TO Act and Look 
Rigidly adhere to fashion. Always be conscious that you are in the form of a human 
being. The color of the dress must suit the eyes and the occasion. Any peculiarity in 
speech, such as correct pronunciation, will attract attention to you and assure you of the 
envied place in society. When visiting the president, do not neglect to leave your 
visiting card. 

CHAPTER II 

Ettaket of the School 

Rule 1. All letters'read in company must be read aloud. 

Rule 2. All whispering should be done aloud to avoid suspicion. 

Rule 3. When one wishes to deliver a message to the next floor, he or she should 
scream it out in a loud, dear voice so as to have many witnesses. This is the customary 
way and is popular because it conserves energy. 

Rule 4. Learn all you can (especially on exams). 

Rule 5. "Vitalize your studies" with as much social activity as possible. 

Rule 6. It smacks of poor taste not to stop and talk to every one in the halls. 
Consideration for others does not always demand silence (of course this does not in- 
clude maids and faculty members). 

Rule 7. Radiator caps should never we worn to formal parties. 

Rule 8. The girl should hold the boy's arm to prevent his escape. 

Rule 9. Quiet hour is the time reserved for making love on paper. 

Rule 10. Hats should be worn to ehuroh for the benefit of bald headed men. 

Rule 11. Freshmen are not allowed to carry their pet dogs to classes and especially 
to the table. 

Rule 12. College boys have to look at short dresses. 

Rule 13. College girls have to endure odious breaths and listen to dumbells practice 
love-making. 

CHAPTER III 

Table Manners 
Keep the hands in the lap while eating. 
Do not use the napkin for a handerchief. 
Prune, peach or cherry stones should be held in the mouth until after leaving 

It is quite proper for every one to take the last helping of any dish. 
Always appear anxious to be served or the waiter will think you do not care 
irse. 
If you see that others are finishing the meal first, it is permissible to use the 

Always gargle soup well before swallowing. 
Sniff all hot drinks well before tasting. 

The feet should not be propped upon the table before every one has finished 
various reasons. 

Waste matter, as deposits from the mouth, should never be placed on the 
table cloth but in the cuspidor. 

Rule 11. Any noise made sipping soup or eating will prove to the hostess that one- 
is enjoying his food. 

Rule 12. When tobacco or snuff is served one should never be seen spitting. 
Rule 13. When one is obliged to continue eating after others are through, he 
should leave the table with the desired food in his hand. Never keep any one w r aiting 
when it is avoidable. This shows disrespect for the feelings of others. 



Rule 


2 t 


Rule 


3. 


the table. 


Rule 


4. 


Rule 


5. 


for the 


CO 


Rule 


6. 


knife. 




Rule 


7. 


Rule 


8. 


Rule 


9. 


eating- 


for 


Rule 


10 



One Hundred Thirty-two 




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THE-PINE-KNCT 



Atlantic Christian College 

Wilson, North Carolina 




Atlantic Christian College offers 
to young men and women of the 
Carolinas an opportunity to secure 
a liberal education in a standard 
college of limited enrollment at a 
minimum expense and under 
christian influence. 

Information about its life and 
work will be gladly given. 



Atlantic Christian College 



Jf'ilson, North Carolina 





No. 306 — Closed School Bus Body 

Mounted on Ford One-ton Chassis 

Specifications — Length. 12'6" — Width, 60" — Height, Inside, 56" 

This is a Metal Panel 'Hody with Hardwood Frame 

Rigidly hraced. and built by thoroughly experienced 

mechanics, who have been building 

Bus Bodies for years 

Painting — Brewster Green with appropriate 
striping. Trimmed with best quality mule 
skin. Equipped with drop sash, as illustrated 
n cut. It is provided with front and rear 
door controls, operated from the driver's seat. 

For all-year-round transportation of school children 
this body is most ideal in every way. Has a com- 
fortable seating capacity for twenty-five children. 

Manufactured by 

HACKNEY BROTHERS 

(INCORPORATED) 

NORTH CAROLINA 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



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First Christian Church 

Wilson, N. C. 

The Church in Wilson that seeks to 

understand the problems of college 

fe. and offers its service in 

their solution 



S* Jt 



& J« 



W. W. SIMMS CO. 

MANUFACTURE LUMBER OF 
ALL KINDS 

Sash, Doors and Blinds and whatever 

is needed in the Construction 

of your Home. 

ESTIMATES FURNISHED ON 
APPLICATION 



Jt ■< 





Phone 480 




Jju£jmf>e. 



A FLAVOR YOU CANT FORGET . 



Nugrape Bottling Company of Wilson 



Wilson, N. C. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



WE OPERATE AN UP-TO-DATE DRY CLEANING 
AND DYE PLANT 




^gssaniH 



SUITS PRESSED WHILE YOU WAIT 

Ladies' Work a Specialty 

HATS CLEANED AND BLOCKED 

W. BARNES STREET PHONE 594 WILSON, N. C. 



■M J* 



PURELY AMERICAN 
CLEAN AND EFFICIENT SERVICE 

WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 

WILSON, N. C. 



■J* Jt 




\uK 





THE-PINEKNOT 



m 



1 



s 










EFIRD' 


s 






Wilsons 


Busiest 


Department Store 








BUYS FOR LESS- 


-SELLS 


FOR LESS 










STORES AT 








Charlotte, 


N. C. 






Concord, N. C. 






Gaston ia. 


V. C. 






Winston-Salem. N. C. 






Rock Hill 


S. C. 






Durham, N. C. 






Columbia. 


S. C. 






Rocky Mount, N. C. 






Salisbury. 


N. C. 






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Anderson. 


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Albemarle 


N. C. 






Greensboro, N. C. 






Wilmingto 


n, N. C. 






Greer, S. C. 






Spartanbu 


•g, s. C. 






Laurinburg, N. C. 






Lumberton 


, N. C. 






Greenwood, S. C. 






Lexington. 


N. C. 






Burlington. N. C. 






Lincolnton 


, N. C. 






Cherryville, N. C. 






Lenoir, N. 


C. 






Forest City, N. C. 






Wilson, N. 


c. 






Shelby, N. C. 






Statesville. 


N. C. 






Danville, Va. 






Sumter, S. 


C. 






Goldsboro. N. C. 






Kannapolis 


, N. C. 






Florence, S. C. 










NEW YORK OFFICE 










3 West 


29th St. 






Life's 


Most 


Imp 


ortant 


Lesson is — 








LEARN 


TO SAVE 




ONE DOLLAR WILI 


. START 


A SAVINGS ACCOUNT WITH 


THE 


FARMERS BANKING & TRUST 


CO. 








WILSON. N. C. 






R. H. Bo 


SWELL. President 






E. H. Anderson. 


Cashier 






THE-PINE-KNOT 



NORFOLK SOUTHERN 
RAILROAD 



Norfolk Southern Railroad operates unexcelled service between 
Raleigh, Goldsboro and intermediate points in eastern North Carolina. 
Pullman drawing room sleeping cars are operated between Raleigh and 
Norfolk, serving the following principal stations, viz.: Wendell, Zebulon, 
Wilson, Farmville. Greenville, Washington. Pinetown. Plymouth, Eden- 
ton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock, making connections with other 
lines at Norfolk. Raleigh and Wilson. 

Pullman buffet parlor cars and drawing room sleeping cars are ope- 
rated between New Bern and Norfolk, serving the following principal 
stations, viz.: Vanceboro. Washington, Pinetown. Plymouth, Mackeys, 
Edenton, Hertford, Elizabeth City, Moyock and intermediate stations, 
making connections at New Bern for Goldsboro, Beaufort and inter- 
mediate points; connecting at Norfolk with all connecting lines. 

Low rate summer excursion, week-end and Sunday excursion fares 
are available during the summer season to Norfolk, Virginia Beach, 
Elizabeth City, Nags Head, Morehead City, Beaufort. Jackson Springs, 
Aquadale, Norwood (for Rocky River Springs I . 

For fares, pullman reservations and any other information, call on 
any Norfolk Southern ticket agent or apply to 

J. F. DALTON, 

General Passenger Agent, 

Norfolk. Va. 



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THK-P1NE-KNQT 



BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY 

WILSON, PLYMOUTH, WHITAKERS AND BAILEY 

CAPITAL, SURPLUS AND 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 

OVER $600,000.00 



"WHERE 

SAVINGS 

ARE GREATEST" 



/? CJATIOS'-WIDE 
IKSTITUTIUN- 

[fcnney 

r DEPARTMENT STORE." 



Co 



Nash anil Tarboro Streets 
Wilson, N. C. 





P, L. WOODARD 
& COMPANY 

GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 

General Agents 

CONTENTNEA GUANO CO. 

Telephone 70 
Wilson. N. C. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



THE 

PLANTERS 

BANK 

Wilson, N. C. 



CAPITAL and 
SURPLUS 
OVER 
$125,000.00 



We Offer Complete Banking Service for Every Business Need 
4 Per Cent Paid on Savings Accounts. Interest Compounded Quarterly 

Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent at $3 per Year 
W. C. Boiette, President Georce E. Walston, Vice Pres. and Cashier 





CENTRE BRICK WAREHOUSE 

WILSON. N. C. 

For the Sale of Leaf Tobacco 

THE CENTRE BRICK IS THE LEADING WAREHOUSE ON THE 

LARGEST TOBACCO MARKET IN 

THE WORLD 

COZART, EAGLES AND CARR 

Owners and Proprietors 




n 



ms 




THE-PINE-KNOT 



W. M. Wiggins & Co. 



Plumbing and 
Heating Contractors 

HOT WATER, STEAM AND 
VAPOR HEATING 

SYSTEMS 

Telephone 81 

Office: Barnes and Pine Streets 

Wilson, N. C. 



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DICK'S 

HOT DOGS AND 
SANDWICHES 

The Place Where College 
Men Eat 



j* J* 




STOP and THINK 

Let this advertisement be the interrupting idea that will put 
you on the right track. You know you need a business training, 
and that you will be properly placed when you get it. 

STUDY and WIN 

You must apply yourself, if you would occupy the place you 
want to reach. You must study to win, and a course here will 
give you the practical training you need. 

SUCCESS 

There can be little question about your success, if you receive 
the modern training that will fit you for a practical business life. 
Enter with us now. 



WILSON BUSINESS COLLEGE 



SOUTH SPRING STREET 




WILSON, N. C. 



THE-PINE-KNCT 



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Herring's Drug Store 

Prescriptions Our 
Specialty 

Quick Delivery Service 
Wilson, N. C. 



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WILSON THEATRE 

Where the Best People Go 

ROAD SHOWS 

VAUDEVILLE 

PICTURES 



* j* 



Are You Looking Into the Future 

WHEN PLANNING YOUR FUTURE it is tremendously important that you 
carefully consider what Life Insurance has to offer. 

OBLIGATION is one of the things that always comes with the much to be desired 
sheep skin. If not direct and personal financial obligation, then most surely obliga- 
tion, to the good old Dad who "saw you thru." Should your banker offer to guar- 
antee the payment of your obligations if you w r ould agree to start a small interest 
earning savings account with him, you would receive his proposition with open arms. 
Had it occurred to you that this is just what a life insurance company will do for 
you. A Pilot Life contract will guarantee your obligations, give you independence, 
and prove a wonderful investment. See a representative of the Pilot Life; he w r ill 
explain the details gladly and without obligating you in any way. 

IF THE IMPORTANT QUESTION OF "WHAT BUSINESS SHALL I ENTER" 
has not been decided you should consider the possibilities of the life insurance 
business. 

ENERGY, AMBITION, and EDUCATED MINDS are needed, and in no field 
are the opportunities greater for the college man. The life insurance business is a 
dignified and profitable profession and the field is not crowded. The future of the 
business is especially bright in the South. 

A card will bring you the proposition that we have to offer men of the right 
calibre. 

PILOT LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

GREENSBORO, N. C. 
W. McAlister, President H. B. Gunter, Vice President and .Agency Mgr. 





THE-PINE-KNOT 



m 



Sell Your Tobacco at 
THE WATSON WAREHOUSE 

THE LEADING HOUSE FOR 
HIGH AVERAGE 

ANDERSON BROS. & CARTER 

WILSON, N. C. 




£ J* 



A. C. C. 



WE HAVE ENJOYED YOUR PATRONAGE 
VERY MUCH THIS YEAR 

THANK YOU 

HOLDEN STUDIO 



WILSON HI ANNUAL 
SMITHF1ELD ANNUAL 




Photographers 



A. C. C. ANNUAL 



J* ,** 



CLINTON HI ANNUAL 
BENSON HI ANNUAL 



I 



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THE-PINE-KNOT 



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1 
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H. SUSSMAN CO. 

RICHMOND. VA. 


H. ROBERT DIEHL 


Distributed 2.000,000 cans of food 




products to schools and 
colleges 


Architect 


Did You Eat Any? 




If Not Why? 


Wilson. N. C. Norfolk, Ya. 


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J* JS 


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4 4 


Anderson & Woodard 


Carolina Laundry 


INSURANCE 


LAUNDERERS AND 


FIRE, ACCIDENT. CASUALTY 


DRY CLEANERS 


BONDS 


y our Patronage Solicited 


Wilson, N. C. 


Wilson, N. C. 


■.* ,•* 







THE-PINE-KNOT 



«*« j« 



J. W. RILEY GROCERY COMPANY 



WILSON, N. C. 
J. W. Riley. Jr., Proprietor 

Heavy and Fancy Groceries 

Country Produce a Specialty 

PHONES 394—395—396—397 




<* «* 



AMERSON BOSWELL COMPANY 



Barnes and Tarboro Streets 



Wilson, N. C. 




BETTER SERVICE 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND EMBALMERS 

Ambulance Service 

PHONES: DAY, 210; NIGHT, 571 
J. J. AMERSON, Manager 

..< J* 




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THE-PINE-KNOT 



.!* .!* 



WILSON DRUG CO. 

DRUGS 

TOILET ARTICLES 

STATIONERY 

CANDY 

Wilson, N. C. 



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Carroll's Bakery 

Manufacturers of the Famous 

ABC BREAD 

AND BAKERY PRODUCTS 

PHONE 268 

WILSON, N. C. 



J* j* 




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Spiers China Shoppe 

302 E. Nash Street 

CHINA, PICTURES. LAMPS 

CANDIES 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 



Let Us Help You in the Selection 
of Gifts 

PHONE 1668 



■.< ,< 



CLASS RINGS, PINS and 
FRATERNITY JEWELRY 

Commencement and 
Wedding Invitations 

Visiting Cards, Society Stationery 
Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 

Eyes Examined and Glasses Fitted 

Denny Bros. Co. 

Wilson's Dependable Jewelers 

and Optometrists 

Phone 880 




THE-PINE-KNCT 



Turlington-Morrison 

Carolina's Greatest Drug Store 
WILSON, N. C. 

Modern 

Prescription 

Service 

Seating Capacity for 75 People at one 

time at our Fountain 

Delivery to all parts of the city 

A HEARTY WELCOME AWAITS 

YOU HERE 



GOLDEN GEM 

The fertilizer that produces 
tobacco of texture, color and 
weight. 

Manufactured by 

Farmers Cotton Oil Co. 

wilson. n. c. 



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GILMER'S, Inc. 

Corner Nash and Spring Streets 

MEET PROSPERITY WITH 
THRIFT 



Do Your Shopping Here 
We can Supply Your Needs 




WILKERSON & CO. 

Dealers in 

Heavy and Fancy Groceries 

MEATS. CHICKENS. EGGS. 

COUNTRY PRODUCE, 

FRUITS, ETC. 

OLR MOTTO: Prompt Service 
Opposite A. C. College 

Phones 956—913 




THE-PINE-KNCT 




■* JX 


* « 


Assorted Chocolates 

Try a box of our Home-made Assort- 
ed Milk Chocolates. All our chocolates 
are hand-dipped by experienced dippers, 
no machinery being used and the purity 
and cleanliness of our candies is the 
reason we can unreservedly make 
them a 


HOTEL CHERRY 

Wilson s Most Modern Hotel 

FIRE PROOF 
CONVENIENTLY LOCATED 


GUARANTEED CANDY 
Palace of Sweets 


R. A. CHERRY. Proprietor 

East Nash Street Wilson, N. C. 


WILSON, N. C. 




,* .4 


.* J* 


< ■* 


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Wilson Hardware Co. 


Thomas- Yelverton Co. 


Leaders in 


BETTER 


HARDWARE 


FURNITURE 


Building Materials and 


Service and Quality Our Motto 


Sporting Goods 


Telephone 58 


NASH STREET: Phones 18 and 19 


WILSON, N. C. 


GOLDSBORO STREET: Phone 289 


FLNERAL DIRECTOR 


WILSON, N. C. 


AMBULANCE SERVICE 


t :* 


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THE-PINE-KNOT 



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J* ,S 


"The Men's Shop" 


BUNN HEARN 


FASHION PARK and SCHLOSS 
BROS. CLOTHES 


•OLD STUFF" 


Bostonian Shoes — Eery Hats 
Everything in Mens Wear 


INSURANCE 


J. S. Adkins & Son 


LIFE. ACCIDENT and HEALTH 


209 E. Nash St. Wilson, N. C. 


Service to All 


J* _•« 


■ * J« 


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Wilson Dye Works 


MILLER'S 


For Twelve Years Wilson's 


PHARMACISTS 


Leading Dyers and 




Cleaners 


Phone 127 Phone 128 


110 Tarboro Street Phone 119 






WILSON, N. C. 


.** <* 


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THE-PINE-KNCT 



.-#? 



BUILDERS 
DREAMS 



VISIONS created by the imagination 
precede the achievement of any really 
great accomplishment. The ability to 
weave the threads of imagination into the 
finished fabric is equally important. 

It his been the privilege of the Edwards 
& Broughton Company to interpret the 
ideas of the Staff and create in material 
form their vision. 

From the art work and engravings to 
the finished book, this volume is the result 
of organized cooperation with the Staff. 

Such able cooperation is one of the 
"visions" which precede the building of a 
successful business, and is a part of the 
working policy of the Edwards & 
Broughton Company. 

To those Staffs desiring complete co- 
operation from art work and engravings 
to the finished book, we offer unexcelled 
service. Complete service means undivided 
responsibility as to the result — one organ- 
ization to correspond and talk with — one 
trained director to merge the (many ingre- 
dients into the finished product. 

You, too, may be proud of your annual. 

Correspondence is Invited 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON COMPANY 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



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